Badgers, Huskies split high-scoring series

first_imgUW senior Michael Davies scored the Badgers\’ first goal in Wisconsin\’s 7-4 victory. It was Davies\’ last regular season home game as a Badger.[/media-credit]Through 29 games, the Wisconsin men’s hockey team had not lost back-to-back games all year. The Badgers made sure to keep that streak alive in the midst of a heated conference title race Saturday.After honoring the senior class in its final regular season home game, the Badgers planned on getting off to a good start in front of an energized home crowd in game two of a crucial series with St. Cloud State, but Garrett Roe’s goal just over a minute into the game let everyone know the Huskies had a plan of their own.Roe was the beneficiary of a lucky bounce, as the puck went off a skate and came right to the junior forward who was all alone in front of goaltender Scott Gudmandson.Down a goal, it was the UW power play that needed to respond.With a 5-on-3 advantage, the Badgers poured on the pressure, and after a wild scramble in front of the SCSU net, senior forward Michael Davies found the loose puck and fired it top shelf to level the score.On another power play late in the first, defenseman Brendan Smith blasted a shot past Mike Lee to give UW the lead.The Badgers seamlessly moved the puck on the power play and applied relentless pressure in the first period. Wisconsin went into the locker room with a 20-7 advantage in shots on goal.But with six and a half minutes gone in the second, tri-captain Blake Geoffrion was on his way back to the locker room after taking an open-ice hit to the head. The senior forward did not return.“When Blake went down, as a group of 20 guys we have got to step up and fill his shoes,” sophomore forward Derek Stepan said. “We all had to chip in to make sure we could get the job done tonight.”Stepan did just that, as he buried a centering pass from Ben Street at the 8:12 mark of the second period to extend the Badger lead. But St. Cloud answered as a shot from the corner banked off Gudmandson’s shoulder and into the net.The fluke goal came with just 46 seconds remaining in the period, but that was more than enough time for Street and the Badgers to create a jaw-dropping response of their own.Davies flung a cross-ice pass to Street from his own zone with four seconds on the clock, sending the senior on a breakaway.Lee charged out of his net and attempted a poke-check, but Street made a quick move and fired the puck into the empty net as he flew over Lee’s stick.“I knew I didn’t have very much time,” Street said. “I looked up and the goalie was charging at me so I figured I could make a move on him and get an open net. Luckily I was able to hold onto the puck as I was falling down and slide it in.”Street was right — he didn’t have much time at all. In fact, the puck crossed the goal line with exactly 0.1 seconds remaining.“I got pretty lucky,” Street said. “But to be able to shift the momentum back for us was pretty big.”Goals went back and forth in the third period as the Huskies refused to go down easily, but senior forwards Andy Bohmbach and Aaron Bendickson scored late to seal the 7-4 victory for UW.The energy and effort the Badgers had Saturday was in stark contrast to their play Friday.UW was sluggish at the start of game one and Ryan Lasch took advantage, scoring a beautiful wrap-around goal as the Badger defense was caught watching.“It took the crowd out of it right away,” head coach Mike Eaves said of the goal. “Our defensemen didn’t communicate and [Lasch] was able to get to the post and wrap it.”Stepan scored 31 seconds into the second period, but the Huskies took the lead right back thanks to an error in the UW zone.Gudmandson left his crease to clear a loose puck, but his attempt went right to Roe who gathered himself and shot the puck into the vacated net.It was just that kind of night for the Badgers, who couldn’t crack goaltender Dan Dunn.SCSU added two more tallies in the second period and a late third period goal by Brian Volpei gave the Huskies their first victory in Madison since 2001.“For whatever reason, we were flat,” Eaves said. “And every time we made a mistake we found the puck in our net.”Thanks to the win in game two, the Badgers move into third place and remain in the running for the WCHA title (five points behind first place Denver). But Street made it clear the Badgers will need to be better if they expect to claim the conference crown or play deep into the postseason.“We are really happy with the way we played tonight, but overall on the weekend that is not really going to get it done,” Street said. “We need to make sure we don’t get off to [a] slow start like we did Friday and I think that is what we need to take out of this weekend.“It was great that we responded but we should be playing like that anyway.”last_img read more

ACC commissioner John Swofford to retire in June 2021

first_img Published on June 25, 2020 at 1:25 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford will retire following the 2020-21 athletic year, the conference announced Thursday morning. During his tenure, Swofford increased the number of ACC schools from nine to 15 through two expansions, including one that involved Syracuse seven years ago.Currently finishing his 23rd year in the role, Swofford is the fourth commissioner in ACC history. He took on the position after serving as North Carolina’s athletic director for 17 years. The ACC’s statement did not name Swofford’s successor.“It has been a privilege to be a part of the ACC for over five decades,” Swofford said in the conference’s press release. “There are immediate challenges that face not only college athletics, but our entire country, and I will continue to do my very best to help guide the conference in these unprecedented times through the remainder of my tenure.” As commissioner, Swofford was instrumental in the College Football Playoff expansion and the ACC/Big 10 Challenge for both men’s and women’s basketball, according to the release. He also helped establish the ACC Championship Game and Orange Bowl partnership for football. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse officially joined the ACC alongside Pittsburgh, Notre Dame and Louisville in 2013 as a second wave of additions. The first wave, which expanded the number of ACC schools from nine to 12 in 2004, included Boston College, Miami and Virginia Tech.The conference last August also launched ACC Network, a vision Swofford proposed in July 2016 that gave the league a revenue generator and an avenue to highlight non-revenue sports.The ACC’s Council of Presidents announced Monday that it will revise its constitution and bylaws to improve governance. Syracuse Chancellor Kent Syverud will serve as chair of the ACC’s Board of Directors, which the 15 league presidents and chancellors will fill. Swofford, serving as the conference’s chief executive officer, will be part of the new alignment for one year before retiring. “John Swofford, in his historic tenure, has come to embody the very best of the ACC,” Syverud said in the release.last_img read more