Liverpool’s Lovren passed fit to return for Chelsea game

first_imgDejan Lovren will return to the Liverpool squad for Friday’s game at Chelsea but Emre Can remains sidelined.Lovren missed the Reds’ 4-1 win against champions Leicester at the weekend after suffering an eye injury in training.But the defender has since returned to training and been passed fit for this week’s game at Stamford Bridge.Can has also returned to training following an ankle injury but he is not yet fit enough to be considered for selection.Chelsea will be without skipper John Terry, who has been ruled out after straining ligaments in his foot.See also:Chelsea youngsters beaten by SwindonSwindon v Chelsea U23s player ratingsThe stats that prove Oscar has been transformed by Chelsea boss ConteChelsea not planning to sell ‘fantastic’ FabregasConte confirms Luiz will face LiverpoolChelsea v Liverpool: five key battlesPreview: Chelsea ready to defend unbeaten run against LiverpoolFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Piketty’s contribution to unpacking inequality: timely and relevant

first_imgRenowned French economist Thomas Piketty will deliver the 13th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture. What lessons can he offer South Africa? Watch him speak during the live broadcast on 3 October on SABC 2 from 3pm to 4.30pm. There will also be a live stream on the Nelson Mandela Foundation YouTube account and website. Rock star economist Thomas Piketty will be in South Africa to deliver the 13th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture on 3 October. (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation) • Thomas Piketty to deliver Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture  • What South Africa can learn from Piketty about addressing inequality? • Ethical buying power: Coffee, chocolate and Fairtrade • Top 50 Brands in South Africa named  • Almost half of African millionaires make South Africa their home Vishnu Padayachee, professor and Derek Schrier and Cecily Cameron Chair in Development Economics, School of Economics and Business Sciences, University of the WitwatersrandVishnu Padayachee, University of the WitwatersrandNot many economists with something approaching a rock star status visit South Africa. So the visit by French political economist Thomas Piketty, author of the bestselling Capital in the Twenty-first Century, appears to be eagerly awaited by academics, especially those broadly on the left, and by many South Africans.In 1976, Milton Friedman, then the rising rock star economist of the anti-Keynesian right wing in the US and Europe, made a visit to South Africa. He was wined and dined by the President Nico Diederichs and Finance Minister Owen Horwood. He and his economist wife Rose met with leading South African businessmen, political leaders and the South African Reserve Bank governor, among others.Friedman’s message to South Africa was both political and economic. He was mightily impressed by what he described as:The unbelievably sophisticated economy you have developed at the tip of Africa, thousands of miles away from any similar civilisation.Friedman urged the West to support South Africa and Rhodesia as bastions against Soviet penetration.Two nights before the couple left, then-South African Reserve Bank Deputy Governor Gerhard de Kock remarked:Friedman’s visit will have at least a ten-year impact on South Africa’s economic thinking.De Kock was right. What followed were major changes in monetary policy, including those recommended by the De Kock Commission on Monetary Policy.I am not sure whether Piketty will have a similar impact on economic thinking in South Africa today. I do predict, though, that ministers and former ministers will be bounding up the stairs to join him on his many platforms around the country. I would not be surprised if they expressed their total support for his analysis and his ideas.Some, without the slightest sense of irony, may well make a case that they were and are the true champions of the struggle against poverty, inequality and unemployment in democratic South Africa. This despite the fact that they arrogantly relegated left, social democratic options such as the Freedom Charter and the Reconstruction and Development Programme to the dustbin of history.Instead, in 1996 they opted for the neoliberal Growth, Employment and Redistribution Strategy, a macroeconomic policy. So a rewriting of the recent economic history of South Africa may well be one outcome of the Piketty visit.Piketty’s demolition of what went beforeTo date, data from the relatively short post-second world war period up until the end of the 20th century has been read mostly in sympathy with a neo-classical interpretation. In this period the hypothesis behind the Kuznets Curve was the dominant thinking about development and income inequality. This argues that inequality first increases in the early stages of development, reaches a maximum at an intermediate level of income, and then declines as the country achieves a high level of per capita income.Into this picture steps Piketty. With his 300-year-old datasets he demolishes the Kuznets hypothesis. He shows instead that the turn away from inequality over time and in the course of development and global integration is not assured. And, he argues, intervention in the market mechanism is required to arrest and reverse the increasing share of income that capital relentlessly claims over time.Piketty shows that it was the interventions between 1914 and 1945 that arrested the trend towards greater and greater inequality. These included taxation policies in the 1920s and 1930s which were less favourable to the owners of capital.He shows that patrimonial capital is the largest contingent of total capital. Central to understanding capitalists’ drive to accumulate is increasing economies of scale. Whereas Karl Marx focused on the increasing economies of scale of industry, Piketty shows how the same benefits of scale apply to investment performance of capital.Despite some reservations about his analysis and his policy prescriptions I believe that Piketty does convey an important and timely message. He combines a grasp of western economic history and an analysis of long run historical data to point to the nature, form and variety that western capitalism has assumed over an extended time. Sharply widening inequalities of income and wealth between rich and poor is the most blatant.Piketty does indeed have something to say to the beneficiaries of this variety of capitalism who praise and parrot this model and its values. This includes the corporates and the ever-richer elites and to many in aspirant and new middle classes in countries including South Africa and India.So, what are Piketty’s answers?Piketty is right to point to the need for a robust debate about the kind of state – a social state, he calls it – that is required at the beginning of the 21st century to regulate a rampant inegalitarian capitalism. New institutions and instruments are needed to regain control over globalised financial capitalism, and “to achieve a just social order”. But when it comes to specifics, Piketty’s economic policy prescriptions are not very convincing.In my view, they do not take progressive macroeconomic policy much further. If anything it sets back thinking in this crucial policy arena, both at national and global level. His policy response to the crisis he correctly analyses, as Chris Gregory notes, is constructed:… in the narrowest apolitical, mathematical tradition of 20th century mainstream economics.An international tax on capital is not likely to be implementable under current national or regional political models. Action is more likely to originate at a national, not international level. In my view this would include a serious relook at old and new forms of control over currency, capital mobility and banking regulation.Piketty has little to say about all this, apart from noting (on the basis of China’s admittedly opaque and unstable system of capital regulation) that:… capital controls are one way of regulating and containing the dynamics of wealth inequality.But how would this work in more democratic, transparent and liberal regimes than the China of today?By way of contrast, and much more practically, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz has teamed up with others to push for US national economic policy options aimed at curbing the flow of economic gains to the wealthiest and most powerful. Those he has teamed up with include New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and US Senator Elizabeth Warren.Their argument is based on the premise that “equality and economic performance are complementary rather than opposing forces”. On the agenda are policies such as increased taxes on the wealthy to fund education, affordable housing and job-creating infrastructure, as well as minimum wages and benefits for the poor.These issues, and a few others, are of relevance to South Africa today. The others would include an appropriate form and shape of a “social state”, tax policy, a national minimum wage, and capital controls to curb the billions of dollars leaving South Africa legally and illegally. Perhaps Piketty can be persuaded to share his views on these matters.Vishnu Padayachee, Distinguished Professor and Derek Schrier and Cecily Cameron Chair in Development Economics, School of Economics and Business Sciences, University of the WitwatersrandThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

Mobile clinic to help township residents

first_imgCustom built on a mid-sized truck frame, the mobile clinic measures 10m by 2.5m and is divided into two parts: a maternal and child care section and a dental care section. (Image: Philips South Africa)On its sixth annual Cape Town to Cairo roadshow, Philips is helping to deliver primary health care to three townships in Johannesburg.In a partnership between electronics multinational Phillips, the Nozala Trust and the Rhiza Foundation, a mobile clinic will deliver basic primary health care to thousands of people who have little or no access to health care facilities. The populous townships of Diepsloot, Cosmo City and Orange Farm, in northern Johannesburg, will benefit from this collaboration.Through the mobile clinic, the partners aim to improve quality of life and provide access to health services, particularly access to maternal and child health and dental care. Another goal is the treatment of hundreds of patients every month. This roadshow marks the pilot launch of the mobile clinic; the ambition is to scale it up to five over the next five years in different communities, based on the outcomes of the initial pilot.Jose Fernandes, the general manager of Philips health care Southern Africa, said: “In many African countries including South Africa, there is a chronic shortage of suitable equipment or necessary skills to facilitate safe delivery and appropriate new-born care, as well as dental care. [Bringing] health care directly to those most in need shortens the waiting period and improves access, which ultimately saves lives.“Innovation as a means to improve people’s lives is at the heart of who we are at Philips and we increasingly seek engagement and co-creation opportunities with organisations like the Rhiza Foundation that can result in making a difference in the lives of South Africa citizens.”THE CLINICCustom built on a mid-sized truck frame, the mobile clinic measures 10m by 2.5m and is divided into two parts: a maternal and child care section and a dental care section.It is staffed by an-all women team of a registered nurse, a dental therapist, a dental assistant and a driver-assistant. The team meets another of the project’s goals, namely to empower and uplift women.The mobility of the clinic allows it to expand geographic coverage when it comes to patient care.In addition, there is an educational aspect. Informative videos are screened on Philips plasma screens for patients and visitors.MATERNAL SCREENINGSOn its annual Cape Town to Cairo roadshows, Philips champions UN Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, which are related to reducing child mortality and improving maternal health. The mobile clinic project, conceptualised by the Rhiza Foundation, offers a good synergy to address the issue of maternal and infant mortality.According to the Philips Fabric of Africa trends report, women in Africa are at significant risk of premature death, with particularly high mortality rates recorded in pregnancy. Women in semi-urban and rural areas across Africa often die as a result of preventable complications during child birth as they have no access to ultrasound screenings to detect critical conditions. Many of these deaths can be diagnosed with basic imaging technology.Alef Meulenberg, the chairman and founder of the foundation, said: “Rhiza stands for community development at large, through education, skills and enterprise development as well as primary health care that makes a sustainable difference in township communities in Johannesburg and Cape Town. Our goal is to make people self-sustaining, through our holistic approach regarding community and socio-economic development.”The foundation was extremely proud of the mobile clinic. “We are confident that it will provide and improve primary health care in township communities that currently lack regular access to these services.”INNOVATIVE EQUIPMENTPhillips has also installed its innovative VISIQ ultrasound, which is the size of a tablet, in the clinic. VISIQ is the first ultra-mobile ultrasound system. It is approximately 10 times smaller than a traditional ultrasound machine, with reduced energy consumption. It is ideally tailored for the mobile clinic. It will be used for screening, triage and foetal well-being scans, all of which will help to address the critical issue of maternal and infant care.Other diagnostic and maternal imaging technology includes: the Philips Avalon Foetal Monitor to detect foetal heart beat and uterus contractions, and a Goldway Colposcope to capture live images of the cervix.The next stop on the Cape Town to Cairo roadshow will be Nairobi, Kenya, from 26 to 29 May. Follow the journey via Twitter @philipsSafrica or visit www.philips.com/C2CAfrica.Royal Philips is a diversified health and well-being company with a focus on cardiac care, acute care and home health care, energy efficient lighting solutions and new lighting applications, as well as male shaving and grooming, and oral health care.Issues that have been tackled over the last five years of the roadshow have included mother and child care, the rise of non-communicable diseases, energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) and solar lighting solutions, as well as clinical education and training.The Dutch company also promotes LED lighting in Africa on the roadshows, enabling efficient energy management, reducing costs, improving city life, and extending the day for rural areas with solar lighting. It has introduced several breakthrough energy-efficient LED lighting innovations.last_img read more

How to Shoot a Car Conversation Scene

first_imgHere are some different approaches you can take the next time you want to take your shot on the road.Top image: Pulp Fiction via MiramaxThere’s something about the cinematic road scene that is deeply embedded in American film and culture. Whether it’s Thelma & Louise or Little Miss Sunshine or Dumb and Dumber, there’s cinematic beauty in the conversations we have while trapped inside a car. However, from a DP’s perspective, it can be one of the most difficult and taxing set-ups to tackle.Green ScreenThis method involves the least amount of moving (parts, and in general) but the greatest amount of post-production. Leaving the car stationary and setting up a green screen will allow you to control the scene as much as possible. However, it will require some serious editing chops to fill every mirror and window reflection in a believable way that looks natural.Camera MountThe car mount method (dash cam, side mount, etc…) would be your best DIY small-production option. It’s also the riskiest in terms of possibly damage to your camera or gear. The small dashboard cam might be the safest shot possible, but it’s also one of the most used. Unless you’re project is embracing a practical DIY approach, it would be worth it to invest time or money into other options.Tow CarThis is the professional method of choice (outside of major blockbusters with full production facilities). The tow car gives you maximum control of your car “set” while in a natural, uncontrolled environment. Tow car production still requires a production team and solid coordination (especially for filming scenes multiple times from multiple angles). But if you can afford a tow car (or makeshift trailer), you’ll get the most authentic cinematic look.Have any other approaches you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

NAB 2018: DJI Officially Introduces New Camera Control Systems

first_imgDJI also showed off its new Force Pro as another solid wireless camera movement control system to consider. Built for similar precision synchronization and accuracy, the DJI Force Pro offers communication latency as low as 10 milliseconds. It also offers an embedded compass and high-precision IMU for keeping your gimbal steady and safe when moving. The Force Pro uses a similar 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz wireless transmission system which can operate at a distance of up to 3 kilometers.The DJI Force Pro is compatible with all sorts of accessories, monitors, and video transmission systems. It also comes with an adapter that makes it easy to mount on a tripod. Check out DJI’s Force Pro’s page for more information. The DJI Force Pro is available for pre-order for $1,200.For more news from the NAB 2018 floor, check out some of these articles below.NAB 2018: Fujifilm’s X-H1 Camera Gets Put to the TestNAB 2018: Aputure Reveals A Brand-New RGB Panel LightNAB 2018 Announcement: Atomos Unveils the Ninja VNAB 2018 Announcement: Canon’s C700 Goes Full FrameNAB 2018: SmallHD Unveils 5 New Focus Monitors DJI showed off its latest camera control technology with the Master Wheel and Force Pro at NAB 2018. We take a closer look.DJI, the Chinese technology company known for drones and gimbals, surprised some with its NAB 2018 major announcements being focused on camera control. Still, these two new camera control systems could be game changers for digital filmmakers looking for high-end precision controls.Let’s look at DJI’s Master Wheels and Force Pro’s announced tech and specs.Master Wheel As far as wireless camera movement controls go, DJI has delivered a plumb with their Master Wheels setup. The controller, which looks like something out of a 2024-version of Mario Kart, uses high-precision sensors, advanced control algorithms, and state of the art product design to detect subtle movements and transmit them to your connected gimbal system. The rig allows lots of manual adjustments for a more intuitive and interactive design and features a dual-frequency 2.4GHz and 5.8 GHz wireless transmission system.For DJI users, the Master Wheels are compatible with the Ronin 2, Ronin S, and third-party gimbals through its S-BUS connection. You can read more on it here and preorder the one you need. Choose between the $8,000 level (3-Axis Model), $6,000 (2-Axis Model), or $2,500 (Single Wheel Control Module).Force Prolast_img read more

Messi, Argentina Beaten 3-0 at World Cup, Croatia Advances

first_imgNIZHNY NOVGOROD, Russia (AP) — Lionel Messi’s frustrating international career may be coming to an early and anti-climactic finish after Argentina’s worst loss in World Cup group play in 60 years.With Diego Maradona watching from the stands, the 2014 runners-up were routed by Croatia 3-0 Thursday. The Croats are moving on to the round of 16.Messi got off only one shot in a defeat that pushed Argentina to the brink of elimination. Messi, who turns 31 on Sunday, has never won a major title with Argentina’s senior national team despite of decade of championships with Barcelona and five player of the year awards.“He is our captain, he leads the team and we quite simply couldn’t pass to him,” Argentina coach Jorge Sampaoli said. “We work to give Leo the ball, but the opponent also works hard to prevent him from getting the ball.”Messi also missed a penalty kick in his team’s opening 1-1 draw against Iceland.Argentina, hurt by the poor play of goalkeeper Willy Caballero on Thursday, had not lost by such a large margin in the first round since a 6-1 defeat to Czechoslovakia in 1958. Caballero gained the starting role because No. 1 keeper Sergio Romero injured his knee last month in the run-up to the tournament.Argentina goalkeeper Wilfredo Caballero fails to save a goal by Croatia’s Luka Modric during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Nizhny Novgorod stadium in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)“We have to swallow the poison,” Argentina midfielder Javier Mascherano said. “The game says it all.”Argentina, which has not missed making the second round since 2002, has not been eliminated. But the two-time champions need to win their next match against Nigeria on Tuesday, as well as get help from other matches.Thursday’s humiliating loss came in humiliating fashion for one of soccer’s most storied nations.Caballero mangled a clearance and kicked the ball toward Croatia defender Ante Rebic, who one-timed it into the net in the 53rd minute.Caballero buried his face in his hands while a giant television screen showed Maradona doing the same.Argentina goalkeeper Wilfredo Caballero holds his head after Croatia’s Ante Rebic, background right, scored the opening goal during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in Nizhny Novgorod Stadium in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Ricardo Mazalan)“After they scored on us, we were emotionally broken,” Sampaoli said. “I had a lot of hope. I am extremely hurt by this defeat, but I probably didn’t understand the match the way I should have.”And it got worse as Argentina crumbled, frustrated by the Croatian defense. Modric scored with a hooking shot in the 80th and Ivan Rakitic added the third in stoppage time.Croatia frustrated Argentina throughout the match and never gave Messi space to operate.“Argentina wasn’t confused. We were excellent,” Croatia coach Zlatko Dalic said. “We beat a great Argentina with the best player in the world playing, Messi.”Croatia, which reached the 1998 World Cup semifinals but has not advanced past the group stage since then, will face Iceland on Tuesday in Rostov-on-Don.“Let’s keep our feet firmly on the ground and prepare for the next matches,” said Modric, the man of the match. “We should be focused on what awaits. Every next game is going to be more difficult, but our main objective has been reached. It looks easy, but it was not that easy.”Argentina won the World Cup in 1978 and 1986 — the last with Maradona as the star player — but has not won any major title in 25 years. The Argentines also lost in the last two Copa America finals.GROUP DYNAMICSCroatia has advanced with six points from two matches in Group D, while Argentina has only one point and is facing elimination.Iceland also has one point, and Nigeria has zero. Nigeria and Iceland play on Friday.KEYS TO SUCCESSCroatia stymied Messi for 90 minutes, not allowing even one shot.The Croats played with five midfielders and seemed to close down any possible space.Before the match, Dalic said this was going to be Croatia’s “easiest game.” He clarified that by saying it would not be an “easy opponent” but it would be a “pressure-free match.”MESSI OR RONALDO?Sampaoli didn’t want to choose when asked if Cristiano Ronaldo was the best player in the world.“I think Cristiano is a great player. You can look at all he has achieved as a player for his club and his country,” Sampaoli said. “Right now we shouldn’t compare these two players … Leo is limited because the team doesn’t gel ideally as it should. As coaches we need to realize these things and I am the one who needs to accept that.”—By STEPHEN WADE , AP Sports WriterArgentina’s Lionel Messi reacts after the third goal of Croatia during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in Nizhny Novgorod Stadium in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. Croatia won 3-0. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)Croatia’s Luka Modric celebrates after scoring his side’s second goal during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in Nizhny Novgorod Stadium in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)Argentina’s Lionel Messi, center looks down after Croatia’s Luka Modric scored his side’s second goal during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in Nizhny Novgorod Stadium in Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)Croatia’s Luka Modric celebrates after scoring his side’s second goal during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Nizhny Novgorod stadium in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)Argentina’s Lionel Messi reacts after Croatia’s Luka Modric scored his side’s second goal during the group D match between Argentina and Croatia at the 2018 soccer World Cup in Nizhny Novgorod Stadium in Novgorod, Russia, Thursday, June 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more