Jay Street decision sets bad precedent

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Re March 7 article, “Ex-inspector cleared of major counts”: [Kenneth] Tyree’s getting away with homicide in the Jay Street fire sets an interesting precedent.Defendants can plead ignorance, based on the fact that they weren’t properly instructed. I can just hear the defense counsel now: “Your Honor and members of the jury, no one taught my client how to properly use an AR-15, therefore, he’s not guilty of killing all those people.”The jury’s decision is pathetic.Arthur HombachSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcylast_img read more

Areas of fog to reduce visibility, could create isolated slick spots

first_imgWilmington, Oh. — The National Weather Service office in Wilmington says fog will reduce visibility to less than one mile. Black ice could also develop as a result of heavy fog.Here are three tips for driving in foggy conditions: Slow down.Driving at normal speeds in fog can be very dangerous. Be sure to slow down so you have more time to react if traffic stops or other hazards appear. When visibility is severely limited, find a safe place to park, away from travel lanes, and wait for conditions to improve. Always headlights, never brights.Avoid using high-beam headlights in fog as fog consists of tiny water droplets that spread and reflect light. While your high beams are not useful in the fog, remember to turn on your low-beam headlights to help other drivers see you. Stay focused on the road.Driving in fog is not a time for multi-tasking. Turn down the radio, stop conversations with other passengers and keep your attention on the road. Roll down your window to help you hear other traffic on the road.last_img read more

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week: Milo

first_imgFacebook36Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-PetMeet Milo! He is a 5 year-old, Boxer/Saint Bernard mix, who is a handsome, loving, and smart guy in search of an outdoorsy family. Milo loves rolling in the grass, playing with his jolly ball, and companionship. Milo is healing very well from his late February ACL/Knee Surgery, and although loves a good romp in the yard, he must be leash limited at this time. He is great on walks, keeps a tidy house, likes to BBQ, enjoys his crate with an open door, and loves adult people.Milo wants to be King Dog of your castle! He has the most expressive eyes, accented with manly outlines of black hair, and knows quite a few basic commands, including “sit,” “stay,” “wait”, “release”, “down”, “stack”, and “look at me”. Milo also looks quite stylish in his sock monkey sweater! A fenced yard is required to keep him safe, as he really likes being in the yard, and a grain-free diet to keep him healthy. Come play with me!Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit the Adopt-A-Pet website, our Facebook page or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email thedoghouse3091@hotmail.com or call 360-432-3091.Hours of Operation: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.last_img read more

LNG Bunkering No Longer a Chicken and Egg Situation

first_imgOne of the key commercial barriers to liquefied natural gas (LNG) becoming the marine fuel of choice for the shipping industry has been the concern about its availability due to the lack of LNG bunkering infrastructure.“We used to say that it was a chicken and egg situation as the bunker suppliers were waiting for the market, while the market, on the other hand, was waiting for the infrastructure. But the situation has moved past that now and we are seeing new LNG-fueled projects coming in,” Stavros Niotis, Senior Engineer, Global Gas Solutions Group, American Bureau of Shipping (ABS), told World Maritime News on the sidelines of the Posidonia trade show.Niotis added that there has been a lot of interest lately in developing the necessary infrastructure, resulting in an increase in availability of LNG in major global ports.“We have seen oil and gas majors like Shell launch projects to create the necessary infrastructure so at least LNG could be available,” he said.Speaking about the way of encouraging owners to speed up the uptake of LNG as marine fuel, and potential incentives to make that happen, Niotis said:“From a commercial point of view, I would definitely agree that there needs to be some sort of financial support in that respect. From the technical and operational point of view, the key issue continues to be LNG bunkering infrastructure.”The number of LNG bunkering vessels has grown from one at the beginning of 2017 to six in early 2018, with these numbers expected at least to double by 2020, according to multi-sector industry coalition SEA\LNG, whose member is ABS. The coalition forecasts that in the next five years 30 LNG bunker vessels could be operating worldwide.The interest in LNG as marine fuel is growing especially ahead of the entrance into force of the IMO’s 2020 global sulphur cap.“The 2020 sulphur cap has definitely been a driving force for owners to look into alternatives to the heavy-fuel oil.  LNG has always been there as a fuel for marine application and when this driving force came through the IMO regulations for SOx emissions, the LNG emerged as an important alternative solution,” he added. Related: ABS Pens Technical Support Deal with probunkers However, making the decision about investing in LNG as fuel is driven by Capex, Niotis highlighted, meaning the cost for the necessary equipment that needs to be installed on board. Another issue that needs to be thoroughly analysed is whether fitting such equipment would have any impact on the basic design of the ship.“There are some ship types that are easier to retrofit from the standard design, while other ship types are not so flexible. At the end of the day it is a matter of investment,” he added.The role of ABS in the process of making ships compliant with the new environmental regulations is to provide companies with the fact-based information to support them in their decision-making.“We evaluate various solutions for complying with the new regulations. Selecting the optimal solution for your vessel is not an easy thing and there is no silver bullet for all the ship types. Therefore, we need to look at each specific ship type and its specific operation and analyze individual cases separately. These comparison studies help our clients decide whether to burn low-sulphur fuel oil, go with the scrubbers, or choose LNG or LPG as a fuel.“As a class society we are not here to promote the one or the other solution. We feel that every solution is applicable in complying with the new regulations but you need to optimize your ship design and ship operation for that solution,” he concluded.Interview by Jasmina Ovčina Mandra, Image by WMN,The interest in LNG as marine fuel is growing especially ahead of the entrance into force of the IMO’s 2020 global sulphur cap.“The 2020 sulphur cap has definitely been a driving force for owners to look into alternatives to the heavy-fuel oil.  LNG has always been there as a fuel for marine application and when this driving force came through the IMO regulations for SOx emissions, the LNG emerged as an important alternative solution,” he added. Related: ABS Pens Technical Support Deal with probunkerslast_img read more