REStQ to buy French firm in European comeback

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GALLERY: Aker Solutions loads out Kaombo subsea trees

first_img<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Norwegian oil services company Aker Solutions has loaded out seven vertical subsea trees set for Total’s Angola Block 32.Aker Solutions said via social media on Monday that the loadout was conducted at the company’s Port Klang facility in Malaysia.According to the company, the trees are heading to its Sonils base in Luanda to be retested before installation at the giant deepwater Kaombo oil field.During peak work on the project, around 500 people worked at Port Klang. Aker Solutions also said that it built more than 20 trees at the facility, which is a major location for Kaombo subsea work.In recent news regarding the project, TechnipFMC has supplied the umbilicals system for the project. The company was in charge of the project management, engineering, and manufacturing of over 135 kilometers of steel tube umbilicals.Also, ALP Maritime Services was selected by Interoil and Saipem in late February to provide a spread of five vessels to tow the FPSO for the Kaombo project from South East Asia to West Africa.As for Kaombo, it is a development located on Block 32, approximately 140 kilometers off the coast of Angola, operated by Total E&P Angola.The project will develop six of the 12 discoveries already made on Block 32 offshore Angola. The six fields (Gengibre, Gindungo, Caril, Canela, Mostarda, and Louro) cover an area of 800 km2 in the central and southeast part of the block will be connected via 300 km of subsea pipelines to two FPSO units, Kaombo Norte and Kaombo Sul.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

Students react to new safety plan

first_imgSeveral students said they believe new safety measures announced Tuesday by USC President C. L. Max Nikias are improvements to on-campus safety.The new policies come after four victims sustained gunshot wounds on Oct. 31 in an on-campus shooting. The incident occurred after a suspect, not affiliated with the university, got in an argument with Geno Hall, a former Crenshaw High football star, at a Halloween party promoted by LA Hype in association with the Black Student Assembly.The new security policies include banning outside event promoters and requiring university identification to enter campus between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. The university also plans to increase surveillance and the number of security guards on the perimeter of campus.Vice President for Student Affairs Michael Jackson said student groups were consulted and briefed before the changes were announced.Several student leaders said the new changes are likely to enhance on-campus security. Mikey Geragos, Undergraduate Student Government President, said banning promoters should give student groups more oversight of their events.“I think we are all in agreement of having party promoters on campus was probably not a good idea,” Geragos said. “When you get party promoters involved … there is always the risk they could advertise to people who they shouldn’t advertise to and you don’t have control of what’s being put out there.”Molly Russell, a senior majoring in public relations, said she supports the policy for checking IDs to enter campus at night, but is not convinced that banning promoters will solve any safety issues on campus.“The ID thing is huge. I think it’s a logical step that should have been taken years ago. This area is not very safe, and that’s always going to be a challenge,” Russell said. “But I don’t think the promoter thing will really help. USC is supposed to be integrated with the community, so I think it’s weird to go back on that by not allowing them to hold events.”According to Geragos, events will still be open to individuals in the community, but USC will be checking IDs at the door.“We wanted to make sure there was a good way to monitor [events] without excluding those guests,” Geragos said.The university expects all new policies to be fully implemented by Jan. 14, 2013 — the first day of the spring semester.Arya Roshanian, a sophomore majoring in vocal arts, doubts that the Dept. of Public Safety will be able to enforce the new safety measures during times when there is a high volume of students on campus.“I’m not sure how it’s going to work with crowds,” Roshanian said. “During finals week, so many people go to campus at night to study and everything. How will they handle it when a big hoard of people is trying to get on campus?”Nikias also said that the university will increase the amount of DPS officers stationed on campus and at campus and residence hall entrances. The banning of outside event promoters will extend to the Row.Student Affairs consulted the Inter-Fraternity Council before announcing the changes. IFC President Michael Madden noted that the ban on promoters does not apply to party planners.Madden said some fraternities have already started checking student IDs at the door -— a policy IFC hopes to make mandatory for all fraternities.“That’s an idea that has been discussed and will probably be implemented next spring,” Madden said. “We are still in the process of working out the logistics of it.”Some students, such as Sheun Alli, a junior majoring in business administration, said that staying safe is mainly up to the individual.“People just need to be careful,” Sheun said. “The school can do whatever they want, but we’re still in South Central.”last_img read more