ACC commissioner John Swofford to retire in June 2021

first_img Published on June 25, 2020 at 1:25 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford will retire following the 2020-21 athletic year, the conference announced Thursday morning. During his tenure, Swofford increased the number of ACC schools from nine to 15 through two expansions, including one that involved Syracuse seven years ago.Currently finishing his 23rd year in the role, Swofford is the fourth commissioner in ACC history. He took on the position after serving as North Carolina’s athletic director for 17 years. The ACC’s statement did not name Swofford’s successor.“It has been a privilege to be a part of the ACC for over five decades,” Swofford said in the conference’s press release. “There are immediate challenges that face not only college athletics, but our entire country, and I will continue to do my very best to help guide the conference in these unprecedented times through the remainder of my tenure.” As commissioner, Swofford was instrumental in the College Football Playoff expansion and the ACC/Big 10 Challenge for both men’s and women’s basketball, according to the release. He also helped establish the ACC Championship Game and Orange Bowl partnership for football. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse officially joined the ACC alongside Pittsburgh, Notre Dame and Louisville in 2013 as a second wave of additions. The first wave, which expanded the number of ACC schools from nine to 12 in 2004, included Boston College, Miami and Virginia Tech.The conference last August also launched ACC Network, a vision Swofford proposed in July 2016 that gave the league a revenue generator and an avenue to highlight non-revenue sports.The ACC’s Council of Presidents announced Monday that it will revise its constitution and bylaws to improve governance. Syracuse Chancellor Kent Syverud will serve as chair of the ACC’s Board of Directors, which the 15 league presidents and chancellors will fill. Swofford, serving as the conference’s chief executive officer, will be part of the new alignment for one year before retiring. “John Swofford, in his historic tenure, has come to embody the very best of the ACC,” Syverud said in the release.last_img read more

WatchCanadas biggest pension fund considers opening its first office in China

first_img More Email Twitter Reddit Canada’s biggest pension fund considers opening its first office in China CPPIB continues to grow its portfolio in China, with a focus on China’s rising middle class and its burgeoning consumer consumption story Share this storyCanada’s biggest pension fund considers opening its first office in China Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Prior to joining CPPIB in 2007, Kim worked at Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan and Carlyle Group LP, where she never had a female boss. “When I started at Carlyle Asia buyout fund in 2002 at the Seoul office, I was the only female professional,” Kim said. “There was no other female working in private equity in the country at the time.”While that’s changed in the years since, Kim says gender bias is still quite common in the region.“When I go to a business presentation with my team, the counter party very often would look at another male, thinking he must be my boss,” the Stanford Business School graduate said. “As I start to introduce myself and talk about CPPIB’s expertise as well as what my team has done, their faces change.”Bloomberg.com Vinicy Chan Bloomberg News Comment March 19, 20199:20 AM EDT Filed under News FP Street Join the conversation → Expect lower investment returns around the world, says CPPIB chief 2 Comments Understanding the implications of disruption at the heart of CPPIB’s investment strategy, Machin says Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, which manages around $368.5 billion (US$277 billion), is considering opening its first office in China as it seeks greater exposure to the world’s second-largest economy.Canada’s largest pension fund investor could open an office in Beijing as soon as next year, Hong Kong-based head of Asia Pacific Suyi Kim said in an interview this month. Staff there would then work closely with CPPIB’s 130 employees in Hong Kong, which have helped to invest $42 billion in Greater China so far, she said.“As we’re also growing our portfolio in China, which is around 10 per cent of our total fund, it makes a lot of sense for us to consider expanding our footprint there,” said Kim, adding that one of the firm’s key investment themes is China’s rising middle class and its burgeoning consumer consumption story. Trade war, market drag creating opportunities in China, CPPIB chief says Understanding the implications of disruption at the heart of CPPIB’s investment strategy, Machin says Inside the CPP Investment Board: Why CPPIB is working with China to help it tackle it’s aging population problem CPPIB has already invested US$4 billion in a China logistics venture with Australia’s Goodman Group as e-commerce rises, creating the need for more large-scale storage facilities. It also owns shares in Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., Meituan Dianping, Midea Group Co. and Tencent Holdings Ltd., plus it has invested in funds run by Citic Capital, FountainVest and Hillhouse Capital.CPPIB can invest in those private-equity firms’ buyout funds, giving it the opportunity to look at deals alongside them, or make direct investments in its own right, Kim said. The pension fund expects its total net assets will grow to $800 billion by 2030.Suyi Kim, head of Asia Pacific at Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB), poses for a photograph in Hong Kong, China. CPPIB is considering opening its first office in China. Sanjit Das/Bloomberg CPPIB keeping stakes in U.S. prison firms amid illegal immigration controversy Facebook Kim, 46, who built CPPIB’s Hong Kong office from scratch, is “mindful” of the growing competition from buyout firms and deep-pocketed tech companies in pursuing deals. “Having a lot of capital isn’t our competitive advantage here, our competitive advantage is having high quality talent and strong partnerships,” she said.The fund’s China push comes as CPPIB aims to improve its track record of gender diversity globally. It made a commitment to hire equally by gender by 2020 and 47 per cent of new hires last year were women, Kim said.The Toronto-based company’s senior management team is currently 35 per cent female, while there are seven women on its 11-person board. That compares with a 16.4 per cent female board representation for companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange.Having a lot of capital isn’t our competitive advantage here, our competitive advantage is having high quality talent and strong partnershipsSuyi Kim Related Storieslast_img read more