Dyke pleased with Edwin Allen’s early showing

first_imgAFTER two years of success, defending Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association girls champions Edwin Allen High will be hoping to make it three in March, and following his team’s opening at Saturday’s Purewater JC Invitational Michael Dyke is predicting just that. “I am extremely pleased with the overall performance,” said an upbeat Dyke. Despite losing two of his top Class One throwers – Janelle Fullerton, who transferred to St Jago, and Paul Ann Gayle, who has gone overseas – Dyke is not deterred. “It would have been good to have them back in the team, but their departure will not affect the performance as other girls in their shadows over the years have stepped up,” he said. Saturday was an indicator of this as Bristol O’Connor threw 43.72 metres to finish behind Fullerton, who won with the Class One discus in 47.54m. The defending champions had a solid start in the middle and long distance events where they had top three finishes in all classes. Dyke singled out the performance of young Cemore Donald, who clocked the fastest time of all three classes (2:19.30), to win the Class Three 800m. “Cemore is the defending champion at Champs and what she did was awesome and I am confident that she is going to break the record at Champs,” said Dyke. Over the last three years Edwin Allen’s jumpers have been the most impressive at Champs. Dyke thinks his rivals are doomed again this year. “Our jumpers were of high standard on Saturday and nothing will change for the remainder of the season.” The only members of this team yet to taste success are in Class Four, but Dyke is unconcerned about the present crop. “Despite this going to be their first time competing I think the group is much stronger than last year,” he said. Dyke could be right as the Class Four girls dominated the 100 metres. Bethany Bridge led the way with 11.99 seconds. Patrece Clarke (12.51), Selieci Myles (12.66), and Jessica McLean (12.71) finished in the top eight overall.last_img read more

“Bird Brain” No Longer an Insult

first_img“Birds can perform amazing tasks beyond the reach of cats and dogs,” begins an article in the BBC News.  So pay a little respect.  You can still call your boss a bird brain, but had better quickly explain why that is a compliment.  See also the longer article on MSNBC News.    In a related article, Jessica Ebert wrote in Nature1 that “bird-brain terminology” is undergoing a reformation.  The century-old naming convention of brain parts in birds resulted from a belief that birds were primitive, possessing simple brains capable only of instinct.  The distinction between bird and mammal brain capabilities is artificial, scientists now realize: “Signalling molecules and neurotransmitters operate similarly in the brains of birds and mammals.  And researchers agree that birds can learn: crows can pass on tool-making skills, for example.”  A consortium of neurobiologists has revamped the nomenclature to give bird brains the respect they deserve.1Jessica Ebert, “Reformation of bird-brain terminology takes off,” Nature 433, 449 (03 February 2005); doi:10.1038/433449b.Can your pet cat or dog sing?  Fly?  Talk?  Migrate across the world?  Solve a puzzle as fast as a bird?  Don’t let the small size fool you.  Birds are compressed packages of extreme design that are a wonder to behold.  The diversity of skills found among birds is mind-boggling.  A dinosaur couldn’t figure all this out if it wanted to, even if it knew how to select those rare lucky mutations.(Visited 30 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Malaria cases halved in SA

first_imgMalaria nets play a crucial role in reducing the spread of the disease. (Image: Malaria No More) MEDIA CONTACTS • Fadéla ChaibWHO communications officer +41 22 791 3228 or +41 79 475 5556RELATED ARTICLES • Malaria vaccine in final testing • Fruity treatment for malaria• Swaziland to wipe out malaria • Scientists abuzz over mosquito• Adventurer spreads his net wideJanine ErasmusSouth Africa is one of nine African countries that has managed to slash malaria-induced illness and death by half, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).This was revealed in the WHO’s World Malaria Report 2009, released in December. The document profiled the status of malaria in 108 countries around the world.The nine African nations are Botswana, Cape Verde, Eritrea, Namibia, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa, Swaziland, and Zambia. The semi-autonomous region of Zanzibar in the United Republic of Tanzania also achieved a 50% reduction. This can be attributed to the use of insecticidal nets and proper treatment of patients, said the WHO.Aggressive malaria control strategies have been implemented across the continent, according to WHO director-general Dr Margaret Chan. This is due to a drastic increase in funding for malaria control and prevention, which gives health workers the opportunity to cover greater areas with preventive measures.Between 2003 and 2009, global funding rose from $US300-million (R2.2-billion) to $1.7-billion (R12.6-billion) – although this falls short of the estimated $5-billion (R37-billion) needed annually to successfully combat the disease.Chan said the world health body is cautiously optimistic that the spread of malaria is slowing, and the main beneficiaries are the children of sub-Saharan Africa.The report said that four of the 31 African nations considered to be high-burden, as well as five of the seven low-burden countries, have achieved more than a 50% reduction in malaria cases compared to 2000.The report also showed that incidence of the disease has been halved in 29 of 56 countries surveyed outside the African region.One of the aims of the UN’s Millennium Development Goals is to reduce the under-five mortality rate by 66% between 1990 and 2015. According to the WHO, the survey shows that some countries are on track to meet this significant goal, as well as other malaria targets set.Download the World Malaria Report 2009 (PDF, 1.16MB).More nets and better treatmentThe report revealed that, compared to 2006, more insecticidal nets and treatments were made available to those in need during 2007 and 2008.More African households, 31% in 2008 compared to 17% in 2006, own at least one insecticide-treated net. Consequently, more children under five years of age were able to use this life-saving item. In 13 high-burden countries, more than 50% of households owned at least one net.The use of rapid diagnostic tests as well as artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), which are well tolerated by patients and are most recommended by experts, are on the rise.However, the percentage of African patients with access to these vital therapies is still unacceptably low, said the report. Although the World Health Assembly has set a target of 80%, in 11 out of 13 countries surveyed, fewer than 15% of young patients were treated with ACTs.Resistance to anti-malarial drugs is a continuing threat to achieving control of the disease, but the WHO and other agencies are working hard to prevent the spread of drug resistance. Steps to be taken include reducing the spread of the disease itself, ensuring that malaria outbreaks are correctly diagnosed and treated, doing away with artemisinin monotherapies in favour of combination therapies, and monitoring medication so that any sign of resistance will be detected immediately.The report documented the significant impact of the combination of effective treatment and bed nets, and suggested that the Millennium Development Goal for malaria is not out of reach, provided these key strategies become more widely available. It also said the two-thirds reduction in infant mortality can also be achieved with a sustained effort to control malaria.Funding needs to be spread more evenly. At the moment many funding sources concentrate on smaller countries with lower infection rates. More attention must be given to bigger countries with a higher malaria burden, said the report.Preventable diseaseMalaria is caused by the transmission of parasites of the genus Plasmodium into the blood. P. falciparum is the most deadly of the four human-infecting species, being the only one that kills. The vector, or carrier, is the female Anopheles mosquito.An Anopheles bite results in large numbers of parasites moving through the bloodstream into vital organs, which become vulnerable to damage and failure. Patients with low immunity can die from organ failure, and in pregnant women and children the disease contributes to anaemia, low birth weight, premature birth and neurological damage. Cerebral malaria is a particularly dangerous form of the disease.Malaria is both preventable and curable, but can only be successfully combated using a multi-faceted approach. This involves not only effective treatment of patients, but also insecticide-impregnated bed nets, indoor spraying, bite prevention and the development of an effective vaccine by 2015. The ultimate goal is the development by 2025 of a vaccine that would provide more than 80% protection and last for more than four years.With about half of the entire global population at risk of contracting malaria, it is not surprising that a staggering 243-million cases and almost 863 000 deaths were registered in 2008. Of the deaths, around 767 000, or 89%, occurred in Africa. Malaria kills one child under the age of five every 30 seconds.last_img read more

Zuora Announces Z-Commerce for the Cloud

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts audrey watters Zuora, a subscription billing company, announces today the release of Z-Commerce for the Cloud. Z-Commerce enables cloud providers to automate metering, pricing, and billing.According to Zuora CEO Tien Tzuo, cloud computing is a disruptive technology that requires enterprises to become part of what he calls “the subscription economy.” While purchasing servers and computing hardware was a marker of the “ownership model,” Tzuo argues that cloud computing requires a different business model, one that emphasizes pay-as-you-go. Pricing models for Z-Commerce for the Cloud include charging based on demand, reservation, location-based, and off-peak pricing, and can handle cloud service and software-as-a-service billing. Z-Commerce also features a private cloud billing setup for IT departments that need to implement departmental charge-backs.Zuora contends that the lack of a billing infrastructure for the cloud has made it nearly impossible for many providers to effectively bring their offerings to market and see Z-Commerce for the Cloud as filling this gap.Zuora announced earlier this week that it would be participating in Microsoft’s Azure Technology Adoption Program. “Cloud computing opens up worlds of new opportunity for commerce,” said Dianne O’Brien, senior director of business strategy for Windows Azure. “But in order to seize those opportunities and thrive in this new model, we need commerce systems that enable us ability to meter, price, and bill for usage in the cloud.” According to Tzuo, “We’ve spent a full year working with cloud leaders such as EMC and VMware to understand the needs of both cloud providers and their customers. Now, we’ve delivered a platform with all the metering, pricing, and billing capabilities required for the cloud to fully live up to its promise.”center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Announcements#cloud 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

The Passivhaus/Almost Passive House Faceoff

first_imgBlog posts are fairly common byproducts of Passivhaus residential construction. This is due in part to the relative novelty of projects aspiring to the Passivhaus standard, both in this country and in the United Kingdom. In dozens of blogs, homeowners and builders have chronicled the victories, challenges, and setbacks they faced on the way to Passvihaus certification.Some paths to Passivhaus, though, seem more fraught with intensity and leavened with comic observation than you might expect.Case in point is “Almost Passive House,” a blog tracking the progress of a single-family project in Brattleboro, Vermont. Scott Gibson alerted GBA readers to the project back in April, and new developments have come into play since.The blog is co-written by Andrea and Ted Lemon, who grew up in climates with cold winters (he in Massachusetts, she in Chicago), lived for a time in Tucson, and, upon moving to Vermont, decided they would build a very energy-efficient house. Although they initially weren’t planning to seek Passivhaus certification, they were committed to putting in a fair amount of sweat equity into the construction of the house.An evolving visionAndrea points out that Ted is from a family accustomed to managing construction projects, while she is a Web designer whose familiarity with construction tilted steeply toward zero. “In my family we consider it a big accomplishment to hang a picture successfully…,” she wrote in a June 2010 post. Since then, however, she has become immersed in the particulars, and she is now the project’s general contractor.The couple’s posts highlight deliberations over materials, design and construction strategies, and a number of significant compromises: the 2,200-sq.-ft. house has been redesigned to be about 300 sq. ft. smaller than originally envisioned. Plans for a cathedral ceiling were scrapped in favor of a sloping shed roof. The footprint of the two-story house has been simplified to a 46-by-26-ft. rectangle, and budget priorities for finishes have been realigned.The project also hasn’t seen as much DIY activity as anticipated. Currently, the construction budget is creeping close to $450,000, including a photovoltaic system, solar hot water, and a detached two-car garage.But still, construction is progressing. The house will sit atop recently installed piers of reinforced concrete, which are pinned to the rock sitting just beneath the topsoil on the sloping 2-acre lot. The garage foundation has been poured, woodcutting is underway, and decisions have been made on a number of important details.According to Andrea:The floor deck will be constructed of 11 7/8-in. I-joists (16 in. on center) and will be insulated with dense-packed cellulose with 4 in. of polyisocyanurate underneath.Wall framing will consist of 9.5-in. I-joists, 24 in. on center, filled with dense-packed cellulose. The walls will be sheathed with 4 in. of exterior polyiso.The rafters will be 24-in.-deep I-joists filled with dense-packed cellulose.The windows are from Schuco (Schuco SI-82+). South-facing windows will have Climatop Max glazing (with a SHGC 0.6); Climatop Ultra-N glazing (SHGC of 0.5) will be used everywhere else.The couple also has been comparing two heat recovery ventilators: the Zehnder ComfoAir 350 and the top-of-the-line Zehnder Novus 300, which costs about $1,400 more but operates about 10% more efficiently.Going to the mat for PassivhausAs for their Passivhaus/Almost Passive House debate, Andrea and Ted announced last month that, by unanimous vote, they decided to “bite the bullet” and go for Passivhaus certification. In a blog posted a few weeks earlier, Andrea summarized much of what went into their thinking on the subject: “Why bother? I don’t think I’m attached to having a certified Passivhaus. As you can see from the name of the website, I’m quite satisfied with our not-quite-passiv status. Also, I seriously doubt it will make a difference on resale whether the house is certified or not, since it’s going to be a freaky-efficient house either way.“But there’s a symbolic value to getting certified,” she continued. “Only a handful of certified Passive Houses have been built in the United States, which means it’s still an inspiring new concept. One of our major goals in building an energy-efficient house is to inspire other builders and homeowners, and having the Passivhaus label and certificate will help get the word out.”More recently, the couple has partnered with Efficiency Vermont – a ratepayer-funded utility that provides technical assistance to businesses and homeowners aiming to reduce their energy costs – which, Andrea says, plans to monitor the home’s performance. The project team includes energy consultant Marc Rosenbaum of South Mountain Company, foundation and framing specialist Eli Gould of Ironwood Brand, consulting architect Camilo Cerro, and structural engineer Ben Brungraber of Fire Tower Engineered Timber.last_img read more

Improve Your Editing – Understanding Scriptwriting

first_imgScreenwriting: Simplify to ClarifyMany stories actually contain way too much information or take too long to make their point. When was the last time you heard anyone complaining that a film was too short?  Being able to ‘murder your darlings’ and cut out your favourite scenes, moments or shots is crucial to being able to tell a story well.As editors we’ve got to find ways to convey the same story beats but in as concise a way as possible. Can you eliminate one half of the dialogue and still have a great scene? Can you take a whole scene out because its not clear that scenes purpose.  Could another scene already have made that point?Ira Glass has a great 4 part video series on storytelling that is well worth checking out. This nicely put together typography piece will give you a decent flavour of what’s in store:Step Back: Big Picture ScriptwritingFilm editor Walter Murch uses a system of cards mapping out the story structure, based on the screenplay (very much like screenwriters do when writing the script in the first place) to help him visualize what’s going on in the film.The above cards cards are from Cold Mountain, for which Walter was nominated for an Oscar:“Blue with a yellow background means Inman (Jude Law) is in a scene; plain blue means Inman is not in that scene. A lot of blue cards in a row means not much Inman – which makes me wonder ‘is that a good idea?’ A triangle indicates I feel it is a pivot scene. The size of card equals the approximate length of a scene.”Being able to step back and see the story as a whole is crucial to seeing what’s working well and what’s not adding to the overall experience. Sometimes a great scene is hurting the rest of film.Screening your film with people who don’t know anything about it is also a good way to a) see it with fresh eyes and b) discover if it actually makes sense. A huge part of successful storytelling and screenwriting is mapping out the emotional arc and narrative, while weaving those together.  Sometimes withholding information from the audience or a character can dramatically alter those dynamics.Have screenwriting and scriptwriting tips to share?Let us know in the comments below! As an editor, the key to shaping the story hidden amid the footage is to understand the fundamentals of scriptwriting.The two tweets below got me inspired to put together a post on scriptwriting and storytelling for editors and creatives alike.  If you’re like me and keen to beef up your story structure skills, these scriptwriting tips and videos should help you improve your craft. Jeff Ford, editor on The Avengers, mentions several things that he feels editors should learn – sound, acting and scriptwriting – in the course of this interview for Avid.  It’s well worth watching.Follow Basic Scriptwriting FormulasThe basics sound pretty basic, but if you don’t follow these simple things your story will be all over the place and impossible for the audience to follow.You’ve got to have a beginning, a middle and an end.  Set up, develop and pay off. If you’ve got problems with your pay off at the end of your story, go back and check that everything that precedes it is lining up to make that point. If you’re arranging an interview as the basis for your story structure and you’ve got a clip that conveys the information of a beginning piece but tonally feels like an ending, its definitely best to go with how it will feel…or leave it out all together.This talk on the Power of Storytelling given by professional storyteller Jay O’Callahan is one of my absolute favorites from any 99percent conference because for 17 and a half minutes you get to see a master craftsman at work:last_img read more

Khaira warned against trespass bid: Amarinder

first_imgPunjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh on Sunday condemned Sukhpal Singh Khaira for trying to force his way into former Cabinet Minister Rana Gurjit Singh’s factory in Batala and warned that any attempt by the Aam Aadmi Party leader to take the law in his hands would be dealt with as per law.“Mr. Khaira was indulging in cheap street politics to grab media and public attention ahead of Monday’s Shahkot bypoll,” said Capt. Amarinder, adding that Mr. Khaira’s trespass bid amounted to sheer violation of the law, with the potential to trigger violence.“Despite being warned about the serious trouble it could lead to, considering the fact that the move could have provoked the mill workers and staff into retaliation, Mr. Khaira did not desist from moving towards the premises,” said the Chief Minister. He termed it an attempt on the AAP leader’s part to divert public attention on the eve of polling.Capt. Amarinder said the AAP had a history of resorting to theatrics in the run-up to any election and Mr. Khaira’s act had exposed the party’s desperation in the face of their imminent wipe-out in the Shahkot by-election.Meanwhile, Mr. Khaira said he was in Buttar Siviato to inspect the villages adjacent to the sugar factory including Dhardion, Buttar, Gagarbhana, where the villagers had told him about their problems due to pollution caused by the factory.“I had not gone to Buttar Sivia to fight with anybody but to listen to the problems of the people as a public representative so that they could be raised in the Vidhan Sabha,” said Mr. Khaira. He added that he was forcefully stopped outside the factory from examining the ‘drain’ where pollutants from the factory were being thrown. “The police acted as a mute spectator and instead of taking any action against the ‘goons’, they pressurised me to cancel the programme,” said Mr. Khaira.Rana Sugars Private Limited, however, refuted the charges and accused Mr. Khaira of running a malicious campaign against it.“It is so characteristic of Mr. Khaira to resort to theatrics and create a hype and eventually beat a hasty retreat taking one excuse or the other,” Rana Veer Partap Singh, one of the directors of the company and son of Rana Gurjeet Singh, said.Mr. Singh added that the company was running strictly according to the norms of the Environment Ministry and the pollution control board and had obtained all mandatory clearances, which were renewed from time to time after proper scrutiny and examination.last_img read more

PVL: San Beda thwarts St. Benilde for second win

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next San Beda bounced back from its shutout loss to Arellano to tie the Lady Chiefs at second behind Adamson’s 2-0 mark.The Lady Blazers struck back from two sets down with a convincing win in third but lost steam after battling the Red Spikers in a fierce duel majority of the fourth. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThey slid to 0-2 and are in danger of missing the semifinals.St. Benilde came through with 15 blocks, including eight from Ranya Musa. Nieza Viray backed Racraquin with 12 points. LATEST STORIES Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo SBC’s top hitter Cesca Racraquin challenges St. Benildes’ Dianne Ventura as Marites Pablo tries to provide help during their PVL Collegiate Conference clash at the Filoil Flying V Center. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOSan Beda warded off St. Benilde’s late charge for a 25-21, 25-20, 17-25, 25-19 victory t in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference at Filoil Flying V Center Wednesday.Cesca Racraquin took charge with 15 points for the Red Spikers, who notched survived the Lady Blazers’ fightback to notch their second win.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ateneo Blue Babble protests CHR budget, EJKs at halftime performance Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ View commentslast_img read more