Archbishop begins visit to Central and Southern Africa

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Africa, Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By Lambeth Palace staffPosted Jul 1, 2014 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Archbishop begins visit to Central and Southern Africa Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Lambeth Palace] The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby arrives in Zambia today for a week of visits to fellow primates in the Anglican provinces of Central and Southern Africa.The visits, which form part of Archbishop Justin’s commitment to visit every primate in the Anglican Communion during his first 18 months in office, will focus on spending time with church leaders and communities and seeing the work of Anglican churches in their local context. He will be accompanied throughout the visits by his wife, Caroline.Today the Archbishop arrives in the Zambian capital of Lusaka, where he will spend two days as a guest of the Archbishop of Central Africa and Bishop of Northern Zambia, Albert Chama. This evening he will address Anglicans in Lusaka at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross.Tomorrow Archbishop Justin will travel with Archbishop Albert to Central Zambia, where he will be meet local Christians and preach at Kitwe’s St Michael and All Angels Anglican Cathedral.On Wednesday the Archbishop will travel to South Africa, where he will be staying with the Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba.During three days in the country Archbishop Justin will visit Alexandra township outside Johannesburg, where Nelson Mandela lived in 1941. The Archbishop will address the congregation St Michael and All Angels Church, before performing the Walk of Witness to the Mandela First residence in Johannesburg. He will also address the Anglican Ablaze conference in Brynston, and meet with a local Anglican youth group.For the final leg of the visit, on Friday the Archbishop will travel to Mauritius to stay with the Primate of the Indian Ocean, Archbishop Ian Ernest.The Archbishop will visit a new Anglican-run hostel for people with mental health issues, the first of its kind in the country. He will also attend 160th anniversary celebrations at St James’ Anglican Cathedral, where he will preach in French at a service to be attended by the President, the Prime Minister, and members of the Chemin Neuf community. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Tags Archbishop of Canterbury Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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A sainted life: Hiram Hisanori Kano turned internment camp into…

first_img Liturgy & Music Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Paula Sayoko Endo (maiden name, Tsukamoto) says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET A sainted life: Hiram Hisanori Kano turned internment camp into mission field Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 2, 2015 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (1) The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 22, 2016 at 4:30 pm I enjoyed the story and I am so gratified that the author and the Episcopal Church have a strong sense of social justice and are willing to bring to the attention of members of the national church the a period in our nation’s history when this sense was forgotten by our leaders due to fear and prejudice. The potential of all of us followers of Jesus to give in to fear and forget his message and example of reaching out to all, and especially the “other,” and the needy, is always with us. I believe our family met the Rev. Hiram Kano, which I’ll mention later. Our family and my husband’s family were also interned in camps–I was in Topaz and my husband, Todd I. Endo, was in Roher, Arkansas. His mother told him stories of the camp since he was still a baby and toddler. One vivid story he heard was of how his mother, when she rode a special bus that took women in the camp to shop outside the camp, was struck by the African American and some white Americans in this poor area of the Arkansas Delta region, and she especially remembered a woman coming up to the bus, rapping on the window, and then asking how she could get into a camp like Roher–where the internees were provided with meals, medical care, and education with good teachers. I was old enough to have very vivid memories (age 3 to 5) of playing in the very fine desert mud of Topaz, the dust storms, the lines at the mess hall and the bathrooms, which were a walk away, and going to school toward the end of our stay at “Camp.” My father, the Rev. Joseph Tsukamoto, was an Episcopal priest with a ministry to a majority Japanese and Japanese-American congregation San Francisco at Christ Episcopal Mission, for 26 years, starting around 1935 or 1936. After the internment, we had a two-year stay in Spokane, Washington, when the Diocese of California recommended we live since it was outside the Western Command zone. There he assisted a priest named Father Mason in his parish. We returned to San Francisco in around 1946 and my father re-established his mission. After In the mid 1950’s our whole family lived for a year in NYC, where my father studied at the Gen’l Theological Seminary, thanks to the amazing generosity of the Rev. John Byers and his wife, Nancy (John was a seminarian who served with my father). We drove to NYC in an old suburban wagon and it was either going there or returning to San Francisco that I believe we met the Rev. Kano! My father ended his ministry after being called to Los Angeles to assist an uncle, a priest who had a large parish with a majority Asian ministry, and he ended up (after officially retiring) at a largely white church in Gardena where he was tasked with encouraging the many Asian Americans in the area to join. At the end of his few years the church had a number of active Asian-Americans. What amazes me is that my parents were not really very bitter toward the U.S. government–though they felt the internment was unjust, they also felt a responsibility to do their best in this period of crisis and make the very best of a bad situation–realizing that the emotions arising in wartime were irrational, and their contribution to their country would be to continue to live as good citizens and provide a positive example to others. My father and mother felt they were both called in their different ways to minister to all–the needy, the discriminated against, the stranger. (ironically, there were those of Japanese origin had a prejudice against the Okinawans, the Koreans, and even the Hawaiian Japanese-Americans. They were “the other” to them!) They welcomed all these other minorities. I suspect that their experience of internment only strengthened their desire to fight against prejudice!Incidentally, I have a batch of sermons my father wrote and delivered as part of the ecumenical ministry at the Topaz camp. I must take time to study these; they have languished in a box of old, old papers! Thank you for this feature story. It’s an important reminder to us not to let fear distort our perceptions and action, which is especially pertinent in the time of fear of Muslims! An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA General Convention 2015, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL General Convention, Rector Smithfield, NC Taiko drummers perform at the July 1 Eucharist honoring the late Rev. Hiram Hisanori Kano. The 78th General Convention passed a resolution including Kano and others in “A Great Cloud of Witnesses: A Calendar of Commemorations.” Photo: Pat McCaughan/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] The fierce thunder of taiko drums reminded worshippers at the July 1 Eucharist of the intensity of the life and witness of the late Rev. Hiram Hisanori Kano, who transformed his imprisonment in World War II internment camps into a mission field.Asian Americans refer to the World War II camps that housed Japanese nationals, and Japanese Americans as concentration camps.With the passage of Resolution A055, the 78th General Convention officially included commemorations for Kano and three other men and one woman in “A Great Cloud of Witnesses: A Calendar of Commemorations,” for use in the next triennium.The late Rev. Hiram Hisanori Kano’s memoir, “Nikkei Farmer on the Nebraska Plains,” was published in English in 2010.Bishop Scott Hayashi of Utah presided at the Eucharist that honored Kano, who died in 1988 just short of his 100th birthday. Oct. 24 will serve as the official day for the commemoration of Kano, who authored “Nikkei Farmer on the Nebraska Plains,” a memoir tracing his early life in Japan to his move to America (Nikkei refers to people in the Japanese diaspora). It included stories of his time in the various camps where more than 100,000 people of Japanese descent were forced to live during World War II. In the camps, Kano led worship, ministered to and taught those around him, including his jailers, other prisoners, and German prisoners of war.“He was gone three years,” recalled his son Cyrus Kano, 94, who along with other family members and friends attended the convention worship service.The Rev. Fred Vergara, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for Asiamerica ministries, said it is important for voices and witness such as Kano’s to be commemorated and included in the church’s ongoing conversations to inspire future generations.Adeline Kano, 87, said she watched the live-streamed Eucharist from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in Fort Collins, Colorado, where her father had served occasionally in retirement.Myrne Watrous, a St. Paul’s parishioner who attended the Salt Lake City convention Eucharist, said the honor was fitting. “If you look at the lives of saints, it was him,” she said of Kano, whom she knew. “He left a life of wealth to become a farmer in Nebraska and to preach the word of God, to talk the talk and walk the walk.”Granddaughter Susan Kano said she was amazed at the size of worship and the commemoration. The only inkling she had of her grandfather’s role in the community came at a 50th wedding anniversary celebration for he and her grandmother, Aiko Ivy Kano. “People kept shaking my hand – hundreds of them – and saying ‘your grandfather is a saint,’” she recalled.She said that he considered his time in the camps a gift to his ministry. “He had an amazing life,” she said.The others included for liturgical commemoration in Resolution A055 were: Charles Raymond Barnes (who was commemorated at the July 2 Eucharist), Artemisia Bowden, Albert Schweitzer and Dag Hammarskjold.The Rev. Hiram KanoCyrus Kano, a retired mechanical engineer who lives in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, said his father would want to be remembered “as a man of God.”About his camp experiences, Kano turned adversity into fertile mission territory: “He said, well, God put me here, what does he want me to do?” recalled his son.In addition to organizing a camp college where he taught English and other courses, he conducted nature studies and led worship services while incarcerated.Kano immigrated to the United States after a youthful encounter with William Jennings Bryan in his native Japan stirred his sense of adventure, according to his daughter, Adeline Kano. His background was that of privilege: “My grandfather was the governor of the prefecture of Kagoshina,” explained Kano, 87, during a telephone interview from her Fort Collins home.Initially, Kano earned a master’s degree in agricultural economics at the University of Nebraska, and just as quickly became an activist and leader among the Japanese “Issei” or the first-generation Japanese-American community, many of whom had come to farm or to work on the railroads.The Rt. Rev. George Allen Beecher, then bishop of the missionary Diocese of Western Nebraska, heard about Kano’s activism in 1921, when state lawmakers were considering legislation that would preclude Japanese immigrants from owning or inheriting land, or even leasing it for more than two years. The bill also would have forbidden them from owning shares of stock in companies they had formed.Kano and Beecher met and traveled together to the state capitol to address lawmakers, who eventually passed a less restrictive measure, according to Kano’s memoir.Beecher persuaded Kano several years later to become a missionary to the Japanese-American community, estimated at about 600. In 1925, Kano complied and the family moved to North Platte. He was ordained a deacon three years later and served two mission congregations, St. Mary’s Church in Mitchell and St. George’s Church in North Platte. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1936.— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team reporting about the 78th General Convention. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

Global South Anglicans meet in Cairo

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Ecumenical & Interreligious, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Global South Anglicans meet in Cairo Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] More than 100 Anglicans from 20 provinces are gathering in Cairo, Egypt, Oct. 3, at the start of a week-long meeting of the Global South group of Anglicans. The two most internationally significant religious leaders in Egypt, the Coptic Orthodox Pope Tawadros II and the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, Ahmed el-Tayeb, have been invited to today’s opening ceremony. Part of the agenda will include discussions on the importance of ecumenical and interfaith dialogue.Full article. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Middle East Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anglican Communion, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN By Gavin Drake Posted Oct 3, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

Archbishop of Cape Town calls on churches to pray ‘Thy…

first_img Press Release Service Posted Nov 28, 2017 Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Anglican Communion News Service] The primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, has asked churches in his province to take part in next year’s “Thy Kingdom Come” global prayer initiative. “Thy Kingdom Come” began in 2016 as an invitation from the archbishops of Canterbury and York to the clergy in the Church of England to pray for mission and evangelism during the 10 days between Ascension Day and Pentecost. It was picked up by other Christian churches in England and around the world and is now an annual global prayer movement. This year, churches in 85 different countries took part. In 2018, the initiative will run May 10 to 20.Read the entire article here. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Archbishop of Cape Town calls on churches to pray ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Africa, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

‘The church will be there,’ Presiding Bishop tells Florida hurricane…

first_img Judy Hughes, head of school, leads Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on a tour of Holy Nativity Episcopal School in Panama City, Florida, on Jan. 12. The school is undergoing extensive repairs after being damaged in Hurricane Michael. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Panama City, Florida] A current of human electricity ran through the large crowd that had filled the sanctuary at Holy Nativity Episcopal Church. Post-hurricane emotional fatigue gave way to an undeniable, positive energy. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry could feel it.“I have to admit, I wish it had been a different name than Michael,” Curry said, opening with a joke that generated a hearty laugh from the room of Hurricane Michael survivors, easily 300 strong.When the rapidly intensifying storm made landfall near here on Oct. 10 with an estimated wind speed of 155 mph, some of these residents of Florida’s Panhandle lost everything or nearly everything. Even those who fared better than most awoke to a landscape forever altered and daily life upended – trees gone, homes damaged or destroyed, businesses darkened, schools closed, jobs up in the air, and a coastal region facing the uneasy question of how many of its residents would be coming back.Curry spent last weekend in and around Panama City on a pastoral visit to these communities three months after the storm, encouraging them to share their stories of recovery and assuring them that the Episcopal Church has not forgotten or given up on them.“To hear what you have done and are doing, therein is hope and grace and the power of love,” Curry said Jan. 12 at Holy Nativity, during the first of two listening sessions organized by the Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast. With the crowd filling every pew and spilling over to folding chairs on the sides and a standing area in the back, he praised them for their perseverance in the face of disaster.Episcopalians here gave Curry a warm welcome literally from the moment he stepped off the plane at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. The airport manager is a parishioner at Holy Nativity and greeted Curry at the gate.Holy Nativity Episcopal School’s campus has been closed since Hurricane Michael, though classes are being held in portable classrooms nearby. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceCurry’s first stop Jan. 12 was Holy Nativity Episcopal School, a few blocks from the church of the same name in The Cove, a beach-side neighborhood filled with modest houses and stunning oak trees. Hurricane Michael passed just east of Panama City, so its powerful Category 4 winds were aimed out to sea, sparing the city a devastating storm surge. At that strength, however, the wind did plenty of damage on its own, including to the school.One of the trees felled by the storm landed on the school’s roof, creating a gaping hole over the school’s lobby and one of its classrooms, but as the presiding bishop arrived accompanied by Bishop Russell Kendrick, the progress on repairs was remarkable. A new roof was in place and renovations inside were well underway.“Holy cow, they’ve gotten a lot done,” Kendrick said.Judy Hughes, Holy Nativity’s head of school, welcomed them into the lobby and kicked off her tour with a short video about the storm damage and repairs. A projector and screen were set up on floors still stripped to the baseboards, and the group watched the video standing under exposed rafters.Hughes’ goal is for her students to return to this school building by the fall, but their temporary accommodations are themselves quite an achievement. “We were the first school in Bay County to open,” Hughes said proudly. Classes resumed Oct. 29, in the hallways, courtyard and any other available spaces at Holy Nativity Episcopal Church, and in additional space provided for by St. Thomas by the Sea Episcopal Church in Panama City Beach.Teachers and students have since moved into 15 portable classrooms set up like a makeshift educational village on vacant land behind Holy Nativity Church, and spirits are running high again, Hughes said. The school, which teaches preschool to eighth grade, had about 285 students enrolled this year, and only about 20 have yet to return after the hurricane.Curry thanked Hughes for the tour. His goal in scheduling this visit months after the storm was “to remind the church you’re still here.”“The church will be there 10 years from now,” Curry said later, during the short drive from the school to the church. The vehicle passed a man jogging through The Cove. “We’re long-distance runners. We’re not sprinters,” Curry added.Panama City, Florida, was spared a storm surge during Hurricane Michael, but with wind speed reaching an estimated 155 mph, damage in the city was widespread. Debris piles still are a common site. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceCommunities still in the thick of recoveryIf storm recovery is a marathon, these coastal communities are in the early miles of the race.Some properties have been cleared of downed trees and storm-tossed vegetation, while others appear untouched and frozen in a state of disarray. The smell of cut wood emanates from certain parts of Panama City, especially near lots that have been converted to mulching grounds.Residents say that, in the initial aftermath of the hurricane, a massive amount of household debris was hauled to the curbs. Walls of junk rose along the sides of residential streets, broken only by the gaps left for driveways. Now neighborhoods are beginning to look like neighborhoods again, with debris heaps still scattered here and there, some towering taller than houses – furniture, bricks, drywall, large appliances, siding, anything that might have broken free or been damaged during the storm.Some gas stations have reopened despite missing the roofs over their pumps. Many other businesses appear closed, either temporarily or for good. Those that have reopened struggle to get that message across with signs that say, “Yes We Are Open.” Business signs that have yet to be repaired speak in a kind of post-hurricane dialect. “SEAFOOD MARKET” becomes “EAF ARKE,” and “MARINE SERVICE” is now “MARI E ERVICE.”More than $5 billion in losses have been reported in insurance claims from Hurricane Michael in Florida. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe ubiquity of roof damage has launched thousands of homeowners on simultaneous searches for available roofers, creating a service backlog. Blue tarps are the most common stopgap until repairs can be made. Some roofs no longer exist to be repaired, either blown away or collapsed into the building, and occasionally there is no building left either, just a pile of rubble waiting to be cleared.More than $5 billion in losses have been reported in insurance claims in Florida, according to the state’s Office of Insurance Regulation, with most of the claims coming from Panama City, Mexico Beach and other communities in Bay County.The Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast, with financial and logistical assistance from Episcopal Relief & Development, has worked closely with the eight Episcopal churches that sustained significant damage during Hurricane Michael, though all were able to resume Sunday services within two weeks of the storm.On the day of Curry’s listening session at Holy Nativity, the roof was still clad in blue tarp and other protective materials. The session inside was a mix of laughter and tears, applause and “amens,” as about two dozen Episcopalians from across the region rose to speak to Curry about their experiences during and after the hurricane.They shared stories of first responders’ heroic work, of one congregation’s newly homeless parishioners camping out in the parish hall, of neighbors sharing information over downed fences, of students glad to return to school to see their friends, of residents chipping in any way they could to help each other, and of a shared desire to return to daily life.Curry thanked them for their stories, saying they echoed what he had heard from Episcopalians during his visit last month to the Diocese of East Carolina, which is recovering from its own disaster after Hurricane Florence.“They started asking, ‘Who is our neighbor? Who may be worse off than we are?’” Curry said. “We’re kind of all in it together.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, left, and the Rev. Steve Bates, second to right, listen to Episcopalians share their stories of Hurricane Michael at a Jan. 12 session at Bates’ Holy Nativity Episcopal Church in Panama City, Florida. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAnna Eberhard said afterward that the presiding bishop’s visit was a tremendous personal boost for her and her family. Eberhard, a teacher at Holy Nativity Episcopal School and a member of the church, was displaced after the storm, forced to move more than hour away to Walton County until her house is repaired.She and her two daughters still make the trip back each weekday for school, but by the weekend, they are too tired of traveling to attend Sunday services. “I’m without my church home,” she told Episcopal News Service, so returning to the church and her congregation for this session with Curry gave her “the feeling of the Holy Spirit.”‘Serve each other in his spirit’Curry’s second listening session was held at St. James Episcopal Church in Port St. Joe, Florida, a smaller coastal community east of Panama City. On the drive to Port St. Joe, the presiding bishop passed through Mexico Beach, the small community that was hit hardest by Hurricane Michael. This region felt the brunt of Michael’s powerful storm surge, which virtually wiped out Mexico Beach.The community of Mexico Beach was virtually wiped out by the storm surge from Hurricane Michael. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceWhat is left of the community looked like a war zone, with buildings reduced to scrap or badly damaged. Roofs, if not missing altogether, were patched with blue tarp. The main road through town was dotted on the sides by pile after pile of debris, and part narrowed to one lane where roadway was eroded by the storm and had yet to be restored.The scene in Port St. Joe was nearly as bleak, though the neighborhood around St. James is farther inland and was mostly spared the worst of the waves.A crowd of about 125 people filled the church for Curry’s listening session. The tone was more subdued than in the morning session, but nearly 20 people stood to share their stories from Hurricane Michael.Melina Elum, a member of St. James, told of hunkering down in her Port St. Joe home with her husband during the storm, “wondering if we were going to live.”Elum said she prayed to God out loud and made a lot of promises while asking for protection. When the ordeal of the storm was over, “it was a relief, but it was also a responsibility when I realized what I promised,” she said. “I have more to do now because of that.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, center, and the Rev. Tommy Dwyer, left, listen to residents share their hurricane stories at Dwyer’s St. James Episcopal Church in Port St. Joe, Florida, on Jan. 12. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAnna Connell, who moved to Mexico Beach with her three children about three years ago, worked a nurse at Bay Medical Sacred Heart Hospital in Panama City. When the storm hit, the family fled, and when they returned, their house was gone. Connell also was left without a job because part of the hospital was destroyed.Connell struggled to hold back tears as she told Curry about a phone conversation she had with her father after the hurricane. He told her to pray, so she did.“It was the first time in my life that I ever completely gave myself to God. It was very humbling,” she said. “I still don’t have a plan, but I have peace.”Curry thanked her and gave her a hug.“The truth is, none of us has the strength to do it by ourselves,” he told the crowd. “Together we can.”The next morning, Curry concluded his visit to the diocese by participating in Eucharist at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Panama City. During the hurricane, trees fell onto the administrative building at St. Andrew’s, crushing part of the roof, but the roof had been rebuilt by the time of Curry’s visit.The church itself sustained only minor damage, so on the first Sunday after the storm, the congregation was able to return and worship there. That day, the Rev. Margaret Shepard, rector at St. Andrew’s, invited parishioners to write on poster-size paper their emotions on the theme “What Has Made You Sad/Angry” in the hurricane’s aftermath, a coping exercise recommended by an Episcopal Relief & Development official.Among the responses: “So much loss and destruction.” “It made my aunt go away.” “Nothing is the same.” “Fear of starting over.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preaches Jan. 13 at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Panama City, Florida. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe parishioners’ words were still on display as the sanctuary filled with more than 200 people for the service Jan. 13.“Y’all got to listen. This Jesus has something to say,” Curry urged the congregation in his half-hour sermon. “He knows the way of life. … Follow him, love him and serve each other in his spirit.”For a community that may be experiencing a collective fear of starting over, the call to serve each other echoed some of the responses that parishioners had added to a second sheet of paper hanging in the sanctuary, which asked, “What Bright Spot Have You Found?”“Neighbors sharing and getting to know one another.”“The deep goodness of people.”“Coming to church!”“God’s comforting presence.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] By David PaulsenPosted Jan 14, 2019 Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group ‘The church will be there,’ Presiding Bishop tells Florida hurricane survivors on long path to recovery An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Is it Allergies or Sinusitis?

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Great tips to get you through allergy seasonFrom Florida Hospital – ApopkaPollen. It’s the magical fairy dust of spring. A rite of passage: yellow cars, yellow lawn furniture and beautiful blooming yellow flowers in your garden. It started in mid-February and will be with us until blossoms fall in April. If you’re like most of us, it’s also nature’s way of officially welcoming allergy season. After all, 35 million Americans suffer from nasal allergies and more than 37 million suffer from chronic sinus infections.But how do you know if it’s allergies or something more? Below are a few signs to help you tell the difference between these two conditions.Signs of allergies:Nasal congestionClear nasal dripItchy eyesA burning sensation in eyes or noseSigns of sinusitis:Fever and fatigueMild headacheChronic coughThick, green mucousSymptoms last more than 10 to 14 daysIf you suffer from any of the above symptoms and they don’t resolve within a week or so (and are unlikely to be a cold or flu), see your physician, who may refer you to an allergist or an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist.In the meantime, here are a few tips to help you get through the next few weeks:Don’t open your doors and windows, even if the weather is near perfect because it lets pollen inside your house or car. Instead, use your air conditioner. And by all means, break out the dust cloth and vacuum cleaner!Pollen counts are highest in the morning or until it rains. So keep that in mind if you’re planning outdoor activities. You may want to stay inside during the morning.If your kids are on spring break this week, or just playing outside, have them brush their hair or change their clothes as soon as they come inside. This way, they won’t track pollen inside.Get your kids to shower or bath in the evening so they aren’t tracking pollen into their beds. Hair is a pollen magnet.Have a furry friend? Chances are Fido is bringing a lot of pollen inside your home. Brush him before he comes in to cut down on pollen and stray pet hair!– See more on this subject here. TAGSallergiesFlorida Hospital – Apopkapollensinusitis Previous articleApopka High Drama Department presents “Neverwhere”Next articleAre Americans ready for self-driving cars? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom last_img read more

Candidates take your mark

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here March 14, 2017 at 2:36 pm Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSGreg Jackson Previous articleState Rep. Jennifer Sullivan Schedules Apopka Office HoursNext articleA timely play coming to Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Greg, a horrible rumor of your possible running for office? Is it horrible? LOL…..is one of the candidates you are speaking of, a Mr. Poe? I don’t know the dark horse candidate you speak of, nor the Apopka preacher either. Ms. Rumph is trying, and #she persisted!…..I met her at a meeting, I am pretty sure I did……what do you think Greg of the news about the old Flea World property and the CRA over in Seminole County where the CRA board is composed of the Seminole County Commissioners and the staff recommendations wanting to give big bucks for demolishing the old Flea World buildings for the developers to build that is in the news today? Do you care to share what you think about that? As far as political savvy, experience, or qualifications, I think with a lot of people questioning whether they should run or not, with self-doubt, I think that went straight out the door, when they saw Donald Trump get elected and realized he won the highest office in the land with! NO experience, NO qualifications, and worse, a BAD attitude! 1 COMMENTcenter_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom An early look at local 2018 electionsOpinionBy Greg Jackson, Esq.Greg JacksonQuietly, the Orange County District 2 Commission race is starting to heat up. On second thought, maybe saying it is “heating up” is a bit too much conjecture on my part. From the numerous calls I am receiving, although I cannot tell you what the final slate of candidates will look like at qualification time, I have surmised a few certainties. First off, I need to put to bed one horrible rumor; that being my immediate political ambitions. To be clear, I have no interest in running for public office in 2018. As the recently elected Chairman of the Orange County Board of Zoning Adjustment, as well as my work through FEC to address issues with CRA’s across the state and much more, I am plenty busy. Also, with my youngest child entering high school with plans to row for an Ivy-League school, I am focused on her success. So as  New Edition once said “You’ll have to count me out this time.”However, one lonely soul, Patricia Rumph, has filed to run for the seat so far. Judging from her financial reports, she is not a very strong candidate and has only raised $2,716.00, which includes a $100.00 loan to herself, since she entered the race in 2016. Rumph’s list of contributors, 28 in total, includes two ODEC committee members, three people with the last name Rumph, 13 people outside of the district, a few Jones High School Alumni and at least four people who said they are planning to contribute to other candidates that get into the race. One thing for certain is that there are no heavy-hitters on Rumph’s list. Also, Rumph has not done any work in the Apopka-area, so it is not surprising that no one knows her even though she is the only person in the race.Next, a preacher, whose church has been displaced no less than five times in the last two years, has relocated his congregation to Apopka High School and is threatening to run for the District 2 seat. While the preacher has a slightly better chance than Rumph, he is equally weak in terms of experience and qualifications. Although it sounded imposing and important when then presidential candidate Barack Obama declared himself a “community organizer”, when a potential county commission candidate with no political savvy says that, it sounds like something a person would say with no experience when asked about their lack of experience. Interestingly, both Rumph and the preacher will rely on their ties to Jones High School and the Pine Hills community to garner support, which will effectively split those votes. But, neither will be able to get the support needed from Ocoee or Apopka to really be competitive.Additionally, the name of a former Disney Executive who also led a Central Florida organization has come into play. While he will definitely display the executive and administrative abilities to be highly competitive for the Orange County District 2 seat, the real question is whether or not he will want to endure the riggers of a campaign, which could potentially dig into the past that led to his quick exit from the state-wide race in 2014.Lastly, there is a “dark horse” preparing to jump in the race and it is my initial assessment that this will be the person to beat. With the votes being split at least three-ways in Pine Hills by the three aforementioned persons, all of whom are African-American, this individual could quite possibly win the seat almost as easily as Commissioner Bryan Nelson did in 2014. If you recall, Commissioner Nelson nearly received 50% of the votes during the 2014 Primary Election with five African-Americans in that race. The “dark horse” candidate I am referring to has strong political ties to West Orange County, exceptional experience, has won several elections in thearea and can carry the votes in the places that matter, i.e., Apopka, Ocoee, College Park, Lockhart and quite possibly Eatonville.While I recognize that anything can happen with elections, judging from elections over the past 20+ years for the Orange County District 2 seat, it cannot be ignored that whoever wins Apopka, wins the seat. As 2018 approaches and more folks jump into the race for Orange County District 2, I will give my honest assessments of each candidate, naming them as they file to enter the race. The future of District 2 is too important to leave it to chance that voters will get the information necessary to make informed decisions. Like it or not, I will stand ready to provide my assessments of each candidate in the District 2 race; and rest assured that I will do all of this — in my humble opinion.Greg Jackson is a past Assistant Attorney General for the State of Florida, military veteran, current Orange County District 2 Representative on the Board of Zoning Adjustments, and General Counsel for the Community Redevelopment Agency. He has been as an active member of the Central Florida community for nearly 20 years. He was most recently a candidate for the Florida House District 45 seat. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Mama Mialast_img read more

Heavy rains elevate concerns for mosquito-borne illnesses

first_img From the Orange County GovernmentRecent storms and rainfall in Central Florida have Orange County Mosquito Control officials working hard to protect the community from mosquito-borne illness and nuisance mosquitoes. In light of elevated rain, requests from residents to treat mosquitoes in local neighborhoods and communities, particularly in east Orange County, have significantly increased. Kelly Deutsch, the manager for Orange County Mosquito Control, reports that while the division typically receives about 10 calls a day from residents in need of assistance, calls have increased up to tenfold. While not all mosquitoes carry illness or disease, rising populations alone can be a nuisance and distract from the ability to enjoy the outdoors. In addition to their critical role in public health, mosquito control personnel help maintains a comfortable outdoor environment for all by reducing rising mosquito populations.Orange County personnel use several techniques to help control the various mosquito species in the area while being sensitive to the environment and other insects. These efforts strategically take place during the evening and do not include the application of materials known to be harmful to humans, animals or other insects, including bees when applied according to the label.Efforts include:Treatment or elimination of identified breeding environments for mosquitoes.Targeted spraying (where a technician applies a control material to a specific area).The deployment of specially equipped trucks able to apply larger volumes of material through neighborhoods and rural communities.Finally, in the event that mosquito populations cannot be managed on the ground, or include large rural areas, the county has the ability to aerial spray through aircraft.At this time, Orange County Mosquito personnel ask residents to Tip, Toss, and Cover!Tip over or toss containers like flower pots or tin cans that collect small amounts of water – many mosquitoes, particularly those that can transmit Zika virus, dengue fever, and chikungunya, develop in an environment as small as a bottle cap.Cover skin with clothing and/or repellent that contains DEET. Cover windows and open doors with screens to prevent mosquitoes from coming inside.Call 311 if rising mosquito populations become a nuisance or with questions.To date, there have been no reports of the Zika virus transmitted in Orange County. However, officials remain ever vigilant and emphasize that Zika is only one of several mosquito-borne illnesses known to reach Central Florida. While mosquito-borne illness is most commonly thought of in terms of how it affects people, other animals like dogs, cats, and livestock can also be at risk. Heartworm disease found primarily in dogs is spread through mosquitoes, as is equine encephalitis, a mosquito-borne illness that affects horses and humans.For additional information regarding Orange County Mosquito Control visit: www.ocfl/mosquito.For additional information on the Zika virus and how to protect from the Zika virus in Orange County visit: www.ocfl.net/zika. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom The lady at the counter jumped up and asked me did I bring my dog, and I said yes he is right outside the glass window out there and she handed me a clip board and paperwork to fill out. I told her I brought him to be euthanized. She said, oh no, we can’t do that, he looks to good of shape to euthanize. I said, “have you even looked at him and his big tumor on his leg?” She had not even looked half way at him through the window. She said we can’t do that. I said, “listen, I called here this morning and talked to the lady and you all said to bring him in. She said she was sorry but we can’t do that. I couldn’t believe it. I said are you the person I spoke to on the phone? She said no, and I’m sorry, but we can’t do that……I was shocked, and very angry at them! I had another dog of mine euthanized back in 2012 that was old and couldn’t walk or control his bowels and had to at that time, so I know they euthanize animals in bad shape for one reason or another….and here she was telling me, he LOOKED TO GOOD……and hadn’t even hardly glanced at him…….I left and was crying and upset!……….and could not believe that business done me like that! 5 COMMENTS July 11, 2017 at 4:11 am Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply July 11, 2017 at 5:00 am I am doing what I can to get rid of mosquitoes. I empty the birdbaths daily and refresh the water, and empty any standing water from the rains. I dug up my plants that held water, I know I am spelling this wrong (bromilards) but you all know what plants I am writing about…..they hold water in the centers, and they had very sharp edges that always cut my arms up when I weeded around them, and I said they have to go! They had multiplied way out into the yard, and although they were pretty with their exotic blooms, they were dangerous. My arms are wounded and cut and bruised. I also sprayed some Malathion around and tried to keep it off of the other blooming plants were the honey bees go. I really don’t like to spray pesticides but the mosquitoes are really bad and they pose a danger too. July 11, 2017 at 4:41 am Reply Mama Mia Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 TAGSMosquitoesOrange County GovernmentZika Virus Previous articleGet ready: Amazon Prime Day starts tonightNext articleNew townhomes unveiled in Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter July 11, 2017 at 4:33 amcenter_img Mama Mia Reply Reply July 11, 2017 at 4:23 am That was Saturday and we went back home. I made an appointment on Sunday at Winter Park Vet Clinic on Lee Road and we took him in on Sunday at 10:30. They gave him a sedative shot first, and said he would fall asleep, which took 10 minutes as I held him and talked to him and petted his nose and ears, and he dozed off to sleep, then they administered the fatal shot. Those people couldn’t have been nicer to me….. They dimmed the lights, and played soft nature sounds to calm him, before they even gave him the first shot. They even told me that they would give me a paw print impression in clay for me to take home with a sheer little royal blue bag with a ribbon tie top to keep in his memory. She hugged my neck and told me how sorry she was, as she said her big shepherd dog is nine years old and she dreads the day hers will have to probably be put down. Caesar was my very big old mean baby, but was not mean to us. My C-boy, as I called him. So protective to us, and knew when anybody was at the front of our house even before we knew. I miss him so much, it breaks my heart……he stayed in his shaded carpeted kennel out back in the day, and in our house at night. He was my Mama’s dog, and became mine when my Mama died back in 2006. He would have been 13 years old in Oct……….he would sing when I would sing, and even cry when I would get upset about something and cry…..and would get in my lap when we took him for rides……at least I still have my small dog to keep me company…….this just really hurts me…………. Saturday I called a emergency vet clinic and they told me to bring him in. I won’t mention their business name although I should! They said they opened at noon. I explained the situation, told them all about my big older dog, and they said they would euthanize him, told me how much it would cost, and I said I would bring him in if I could get him into the truck as he was so heavy and the truck up so high. We drove over to 17-92 afternoon, and although we didn’t know their was a bad storm and there was lightning, thunder, and it was raining worse than during a hurricane and I looked down along the road and it was like a lake there was so much water pooling, and my big boy was scared as usual of the storm. Enough water in the roads to flood out some vehicles. At this point I was having second thoughts and said maybe we need to just go back home. I was only a mile or two away, and we went on anyway, and when we got there, the rain had almost stopped. We parked and my husband lifted my dog out, got him on his feet and I said I will go in first to see if there are any other animals in there as mine would have went after them………….! Mama Mia Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Mama Mia I am up early as I couldn’t sleep well tonight. Yesterday I had to do something I really didn’t want to do, but had to. Something I had been delaying since last November. Something that was necessary but heartbreaking to have to do. I had to go and have my old big dog euthanized. He had a very large non-cancerous tumor on his back leg below the elbow that I didn’t get surgery on because he was so old and because of his heart. I tried to keep him as long as I could. I wasn’t like it was cancerous and he was suffering other than unsightly, and the size of it. Otherwise he was shiny, had long beautiful hair and was as mean as ever…….but he was getting weaker in his back legs and sometimes would slide down on our tile floors and I couldn’t pick him up! He was over 80 pounds. If by husband was gone to the 7-11 or Wawa to get cigarettes, he would have to pick him back up as I just could not get him up. So this last week, I noticed the tumor was getting bigger and bigger all of a sudden, more so that ever, and I felt it and it was filled with fluid and hung down pulling against his skin and he would lay on it and it started breaking open partially and I freaked out, and said something has to be done, and he has to be put down. I cried and cried, and was freaking out……….. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Mama Mialast_img read more

Orange County celebrates “Come out with Pride” Parade

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. From the Orange County NewsroomOrange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs joined the community to celebrate the 2017 Orlando Come Out with Pride Parade and Rally, which celebrated Orlando’s LGBTQ community, its allies and all those who stand united with Orlando.Orange County District 3 Commissioner Pete Clarke, District 5 Commissioner Emily Bonilla and City of Orlando District 4 Commissioner Patty Sheehan were also in attendance. The event, which gathered more than 50,000 attendees, was held on Oct. 14 and has become one of the largest Pride festivals in Florida.At the end of the parade, participants gathered for a Pride Rally at the Walt Disney Amphitheater at Lake Eola Park, where Mayor Jacobs presented a proclamation declaring Oct. 14 as Come Out with Pride Orlando Day in Orange County.“Come Out With Pride has always been a much anticipated and treasured event in Orlando, but recently it has taken on a much broader purpose. It’s more important than ever for us to show unity and compassion, and to lead with love and kindness,” Mayor Jacobs said during her remarks. “We are a community that doesn’t just embrace diversity and inclusion, but views it as one of our greatest sources of strength and pride.”Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs joined the community for the 2017 Orlando Come Out with Pride Parade and Rally held in downtown Orlando on Oct. 14, 2017.Mayor Jacobs also thanked LGBTQ champions, advocates and leaders throughout Central Florida for their collaboration and support during Orlando’s most difficult moment in history last year during the Pulse nightclub tragedy. On June 12, 2016, Orange County was impacted greatly by a senseless act of violence and hatred at Pulse Nightclub when a gunman killed 49 people and injured 68 others at Pulse in the City of Orlando. More than a year later, the community continues to remember our 49 brothers and sister, their families and the survivors as they continue to heal from the tragedy.Come Out with Pride, Inc. is a nonprofit organization made up of an all-volunteer board and production team inspired to make an impact in the LGBTQ+ community. The Metropolitan Business Association, Central Florida’s LGBTQ Chamber of Commerce, saw the need for the Pride festival to focus on building unity and cohesiveness within the community, which led to the creation of Come Out with Pride in 2005.Come Out with Pride is celebrated during the first weekend in October to align with National Coming Out Day on Oct. 11 and National Gay and Lesbian History Month. Please enter your name here TAGSCome out with Pride ParadeLGBTQOrange County Previous articleLongest running member to speak at milestone lunchNext articleBlue Darters fall, Mustangs rise in AP Top 10 Poll Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

In case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 TAGSWeek in Review Previous articleI’m a librarian in Puerto Rico, and this is my Hurricane Maria survival storyNext articleLet’s Talk About It – Episode 7: Love and Jackson discuss the horrific church shooting in Texas Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 5 stories that shaped Apopka’s news week:City Council approves bid for EPA-backed brownfield grantIt’s official: The Apopka Police Department is accreditedApopka collects 120,000 cubic yards of debrisMayor John Land a giant in Apopka historyBlue Darters blast Oak Ridge 44-12; await postseason fateBlue Darters, Mustangs playoff seedings announced Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more