Video: Making the Dream, A Reality

first_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Sermons and Lessons Video: Making the Dream, A Reality Delivered by REV. N. ADIEL A. DEPANO, FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Published on Monday, April 29, 2013 | 2:57 pm This sermon was delivered by Rev. N. Adiel A. DePano, Lead Pastor of First United Methodist Church of Pasadena on Sunday, March 31st, 2013. Rev. DePano was born in Manila, Philippines in 1960. He is the fourth child of nine born to Nathanael, a lawyer and former Presiding Justice of the Philippines Court of Appeals, and Aurora, a school teacher and former head of a home economics department. He is a fourth-generation United Methodist minister.After receiving his Master of Divinity from Claremont School of Theology, Rev. DePano served his internship at Rosewood UMC in Los Angeles.Rev. DePano has served as the senior pastor at three church appointments, each lasting seven years. His appointments included First Filipino-American UMC in Hacienda Heights, First United Methodist Church in National City near San Diego, and St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Oxnard. He previously served as Superintendent of the Pasadena District, California-Pacific Conference of The United Methodist Church before coming to FUMC Pasadena.During his career, he has successfully implemented capital campaigns to renovate and refurbish sanctuaries and education wings, introduced exciting group study programs, merged congregations, integrated ethic groups, and developed lay leadership.Rev. Adiel has been married to Brenda, who has her master’s degree in Christian Education, for 23 years. They have three children, Katerina (22), Julian (18), and Pauline (16). Spending time with his family is relaxing for Rev. Adiel, and his hobbies include air/aviation and reading. He and Brenda enjoy travelling throughout the United States, Canada, Central America and Asia.First United Methodist Church Pasadena, 500 E. Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, (626) 796-0157 or visit www.fumcpasadena.org Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *center_img Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Herbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Reasons Why Selena Gomez Has Billions Of FansHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Celebrities Who’ve Lost Their FandomsHerbeautyHerbeautylast_img read more

Pulis ready for rebuilding mission

first_img Press Association Since Steve Clarke left in December 2013 they have battled relegation but host QPR on Saturday looking to move 11 points clear of the bottom three. And Pulis, who replaced Alan Irvine in January, is eager to finish the job and revive the Baggies. “It has gone a little bit off the rails in the last two or three years,” he said. “I don’t think anyone can argue about that, it is now just about trying to get it back on track. “We will talk about it (the summer transfer market) once we have achieved our goals – which is to stay up. We are still points away from that. “Once that is achieved we will sit down and talk to the chairman, “It is a good football club, everything is in place.” Victory over Rangers would put the Baggies 14 points clear of the second-bottom visitors but Pulis is taking nothing for granted. “Every game we play is a chance to pick up points in the Premier League,” he said. “We will respect QPR, they have the tools to win a game in this division.” The Baggies head coach has shelved any thoughts of summer safety until Albion have clinched their Barclays Premier League future. Albion struggled last term, beating the drop by three points, and Pulis is their third manager in the last 12 months. center_img Boss Tony Pulis is ready to rebuild West Brom after they went “off the rails”.last_img read more

Accretion: The Missing Link in Planetary Evolution

first_imgEvery school child has seen artwork of planets evolving from a disk of dust and gas around a star like our sun, but there’s a missing link in the story.  How did the dust particles stick together?Once a clump of material is massive enough, it can attract more material by its own gravity.  The moon, for instance, pulls meteors in.  They stay there and don’t bounce off, except in the unusual case of a high-speed glancing blow.  From the well-understood law of gravity, a planetary body needs to be about 1-10 km in diameter to grow by accretion.  From there, this “planetesimal,” according to theory, would experience runaway growth as long as there is material around to feed it.  Getting the body to this size is the problem.  Smaller bodies do not have sufficient gravity to pull in neighboring material.  A disk around a star, however, starts out with dust and ice grains much smaller, even microscopic in size.  It is estimated that the original dust particles in the primordial solar nebula were a tenth of a micrometer in diameter, too small to see.  How could these grow into planetesimals a mile across?This problem is not new.  Planetary evolutionists have wrestled with it repeatedly.  In the February issue of Icarus,1 Sin-iti Sirono of Nagoya University, Japan, tries to identify the requirements for colliding particles to stick together rather than bounce or smash each other apart.  He certainly respects the problem; in his introduction, he asks with a Japanese accent, “There is a immense gap of 13 orders of magnitude between the grain size and the size of a planet.  How planets are formed across this gap?”  Behold the missing link of planetary evolution.Accretion is a complex problem with many variables.  Think of firing a bullet at a rock.  A small bullet might form a crater, catastrophically disrupt the rock, or merge with the rock, if the rock is porous and able to absorb the blow.  What physical laws govern the outcome?  Sirono, after a great deal of modeling and computation, arrives at three constraints:The target must have low compressive strength relative to shear strength and tensile strength.Impact velocity must be 0.4% the speed of sound of the medium.The bodies must be made of materials that allow the “restoration of damage” effect.  This is an automatic “repair” mechanism that occurs if a ruptured material can rebound such that interatomic forces can partially heal the breach, as if little magnets in the pieces pull them back together.It should be evident with a little thought that other variables can also be important.  To visualize this, imagine two astronauts, Chuck and Tom, having a snowball fight in the cargo bay of a space shuttle.  Let’s say they both have good timing and aim; they always make their snowballs collide in the space between them.  Since gravity is not a factor in the weightlessness of space, what factors would make the snowballs stick together (accrete) instead of bouncing off each other or fragmenting into smithereens?  Here are a few of the variables:Temperature.  Soft, wet snowballs are more likely to stick than hard, icy ones.Density.  Low-density snowballs are more likely to stick than packed ones.  The compressive strength of snowballs can vary by a factor of 1000, Sirono says: “As the density of an aggregate goes lower, the strength becomes lower and vice versa.  For example, the strength range due to density variations is more than three orders of magnitude for a bed of snow.”  So if our astronauts tightly pack their snowballs, they well be less likely to stick, but also more subject to disruption.Relative size.  A small snowball might stick more readily to a large one, than would two of equal size.  Sirono’s simulations suggest that the threshold ratio for optimum chance of sticking is 3/10 or lower.Glancing angle.  A small impactor is more likely to stick to a target in a direct bulls-eye hit rather than a glancing blow.Differentiation.  Let’s say Chuck and Tom throw rocks coated with snow.  They might accrete if the relative velocity is low and the snow coating absorbs some of the energy.Glue.  If our astronauts have access to some kind of adhesive with which to saturate their weapons, the snowballs might glue themselves together.  Sirono thinks interstellar organic molecules might just do the trick.  He cites earlier work that suggests organics might comprise a significant fraction of the material (silicate:ice:organic mass ratio of 1:1:1.6), and that the organics might form a viscoelastic fluid between the particles.  “It may be possible that the organic materials play a role of glue which connects grains and fragments,” he suggests.If our astronauts perfect the art of getting their snowballs to stick together, new problems arise as the wad of snowballs grows.  Earlier models often assumed that the properties of an accreting mass scaled uniformly upward, but Sirono reminds us that the aggregate of particles is subject to new forms of catastrophic rupture.  Sirono explains,There are voids and cracks inside a large aggregate that significantly lowers the strength of an aggregate.  Tensile stress concentrates in regions around the cracks, and fracturing starts from contacts between such grains.  An aggregate will be broken by much smaller stresses than those expected by direct extrapolation from interaction forces between grains.So until the aggregate is large enough for gravity to compress and homogenize the insides, it is even more subject to disruption than were the original starting grains.  Even if a lucky aggregate forms, all Tom needs to do is lob a high-speed ice ball at it and it could splinter into small fragments again.  Better luck next time.It seems, therefore, that many special conditions are required to keep the hopeful aggregate growing up to a size where gravitational accretion can take over.  Sirono does not estimate how likely this is to occur in a real stellar nebula.  He just points out that any accretion needs to obey the laws of physics.1Sin-iti Sirono, “Conditions for collisional growth of a grain aggregate,” Icarus Volume 167, Issue 2, February 2004, Pages 431-452, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.09.018.Observation 1: planets around a star, with a little dust.  Observation 2: a lot of dust around a star, with no planets.  What are appropriate conclusions based on this data?There are two possibilities.  One is that the second star is a young star with a dust disk that is on the way to becoming a new solar system, and the first is an old star with mature planets.  But there’s another possibility.  Maybe the first star has widely spaced, mature planets with stable orbits and few collisions, and the second star started out with mature planets in erratic orbits, which since collided and ground each other to dust.  The conclusion you reach has a lot to say about your world view and your respect for observation.While no one can rule out all possibility of dust and ice grains sticking together, the probability seems rather low.  Sirono invokes several ad hoc conditions to increase the odds.  Maybe if they are as soft as silly putty and infused with some sort of organic glue, with the right angle of attack, slow enough collision speed and the right temperature, they just might stick instead of bouncing off each other.  But the organic glue cannot get too warm, because Sirono says, “It has been found that the shear modulus of the organics decreases by five orders of magnitude as temperature increases from 200 to 300 K.”  This means the glue loses its elasticity real fast as the temperature rises: “The consequence of decrease in elasticity by a factor of 10 is severe fragmentation,” he says.  For particles in the warmer parts of the nebula, this seems to be a problem, yet we observe Mercury in our solar system baking in the heat of the sun, and gas giants bigger than Jupiter in even closer orbits around other stars.  Also, even if the conditions are lucky enough for the particles to start sticking to each other, they become even more subject to disruption as the aggregate grows.Perhaps Sinoro’s constraints don’t seem too outlandish, and one can envision scenarios in which all the right conditions might be met.  It could be argued that out of uncounted myriads of particles, some might reach the threshold of runaway gravitational accretion.  All it takes is a few to get a planetary system, right?  (Actually, our solar system is filled with many thousands of gravitationally accreting bodies, like asteroids, Kuiper Belt objects, comets, and small moons, in addition to the planets and larger moons.  Some of them appear to have been busted apart by collisions.)Regardless, the fact remains that no one has observed grains accrete into a planetesimal, but astronomers have abundantly observed the opposite: bodies fragmenting into smaller bodies and dust.  Small bodies show abundant evidence of cratering and erosion, even the recently-photographed comet Wild-2 (see 01/02/2004), a fact that surprised scientists because this was supposed to be a pristine object from the quiet deep freeze of the outer solar system.  We observe ongoing processes of fragmentation, catastrophic collision, erosion to dust and de-evolution, but accretion exists only in the minds of theorists.  Which principle is more in accord with the second law of thermodynamics?One would think that scientists would err on the side of conservatism, and not make claims beyond the evidence.  But the disruption view implies starting conditions that are philosophically repugnant to a naturalist: if the planets were already there, they must have been created.  So strong is the urge to have a universe that evolves upward from a bang to galaxies to planets to life, that philosophical naturalists will sneak glue and fudge and whatever else is needed to fill in the gaps.  You can believe that the dust around Vega is a young solar system in the making, but be sure your model particles obey the laws of physics.  After all, a naturalist should respect the laws of nature, by definition.  Better yet, perform realistic lab experiments.  We’ll wait till you get particles that stick before worrying you with all the other problems, such as the Kuiper capers (10/05/2003), small moon mysteries (09/29/2003), turbulent stress in planetesimals and in scientist minds (09/22/2003), the rarity of sunlike solar systems (07/21/2003), declining popularity of the planetesimal hypothesis (06/03/2003), migration woes (05/16/2003), the war of the worlds (04/17/2003), the tweak Olympics (11/22/2002), etc., and so forth, and so on.(Visited 41 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

African music goes digital

first_imgThe cover of one of Hugh Tracey’srecordings of Zambian music. Hugh Tracey in an undated picture withPygmies of Central Africa. Hugh Tracey with his record collection.(Images: Ilam)Khanyi MagubaneFind out more about using MediaClubSouthAfrica.com materialRecordings of rarely heard traditional African music collected over a period of 50 years by music historian Hugh Tracey are now available to anyone on earth via the internet.The International Library of African Music (Ilam), based at Rhodes University in the Eastern Cape, is in the process of digitising the music, which Tracey recorded in the southern, eastern and central regions of Africa.Established in 1954 by Tracey, Ilam has digitised 20 000 songs, of which 14 000 are now available online from the organisation’s archives.The process of digitising the music has been a collective team effort. The team consists of sound technicians – engineer Elijah Madiba and his assistant Hilton Borerwe.To give the project chronological order and historical context, ethnomusicologist Dr Lee Watkins and cataloguing librarian, Michelle Boysen, were brought in to complete the digitising process undertaken by the technicians.Eight Rhodes University final year students who had been trained in data and sound capturing were also recruited to participate.Tracey had been collecting music in remote parts of Africa for 25 years when he established the music library.According to Ilam, “From its inception, Hugh Tracey’s vision for Ilam was to encourage respect for African music and perpetuation of its traditional styles.”Discovering African soundsTracey’s journey began in 1920, when the 17-year-old arrived in Africa from England.He arrived in southern Rhodesia (modern day Zimbabwe) with his brother, who had been given a piece of land to farm.Soon after their arrival, Tracey quickly picked up the Karanga dialect of the Shona language by working alongside the Karanga farm workers in the fields.It was during this time, whilst listening to the farm workers singing, that he was introduced to African music.His love for the art form grew, and it became his lifelong passion.Tracey started recording singles with some of the farm workers in Johannesburg, and these were distributed across the world, with some of the music played as far as New York.In the early 1930s, Tracey made contact with composers from the Royal College of Music in London, who encouraged him to continue with his musical research.In 1973, when he released his biggest LP recording of the indigenous music collection he had amassed, he wrote in the introduction, “The history of this collection of authentic African music, songs, legends and stories is in many ways a personal one.“It dates back to the early 1920s when I first sang and wrote down the words of African songs I heard in the tobacco fields of southern Rhodesia.”Despite the inroads Tracey was making in recording African music, he faced an uphill battle within his own community who could not understand his fascination with African music.According to Ilam, Tracey “almost immediately became aware of the resistance of the colonial community, in particular those in education, the church and government, to any suggestion that Africans had any culture or music that was worthwhile.”But this did not stop Tracey from pursuing his passion even further.He left southern Rhodesia and his travels took him to Angola, Zambia, Rwanda, Malawi, South Africa, the Congo (now the Democratic Republic of Congo), Tanzania, and Mozambique, where he partook in various traditional ceremonies and interacted with various tribes to capture their sound.When his travels brought Tracey to South Africa, he quickly learned that the tribes’ music could be divided largely into the music of the Sotho and Tswana people, and those of the Nguni – which includes the Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele and Swati people.It wasn’t just the singing that fascinated Tracey; instrumentation used to make the music was also of great interest to him.In some of his recordings, like a 1950 release entitled, Tanzania Instruments, Tracey focused on the instruments in particular.As such, records made in South Africa were divided into the different tribal groups.As the influences of jazz started to dominate secular music, Tracey also augmented his recordings to reflect this.In 1950, and again in 1952, the music historian recorded the new contemporary sounds of jazz and this resulted in the albums, Bulawayo Jazz from Zimbabwe and Colonial Dance Bands which consisted of jazz music he had recorded in eastern and southern countries.As he was one of the very few ethnomusicologists of his time actively in the field, Tracey gained recognition for his work and was duly appointed to a number of influential positions.From 1936 to 1947, Tracey promoted African music as the head of the KwaZulu-Natal studios of the South African Broadcasting Corporation.He also worked for Gallo as their head of African Music Research Unit.He also published two critically acclaimed books, Chopi Musicians (1948) and African Dances of the Witwatersrand Gold Mines (1952).Preserving Tracey’s legacyWhen Hugh Tracey died in 1977, his son Andrew became the new director of Ilam.The institute originally operated as an independent body of archiving, research and a sound library with international funding.When, in 1978 funding was cut in protest against the apartheid regime, Andrew needed a new home for the institute.Rhodes University came to the party and Ilam moved to Grahamstown, where it still is today.Now a retired academic, Tracey says his father’s passion for African music was passed on to him.Speaking to Eastern Cape based newspaper The Herald, Tracey says he immersed himself deeply into the music. “My approach was different from my father’s. He did most of the recording. I spent time with the musicians to learn more about the music and to play the different instruments.”Current Ilam director and ethnomusicologist Prof. Diane Thram, says on Ilam’s website that once the digitisation process is complete, the entire collection will be available internationally. “When the Ilam archive is professionally catalogued and digitised, its holdings will be accessible to the world-at-large through this website linked to the Rhodes University library on-line catalogue (Opac) and an e-commerce website currently under development.”Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at: [email protected]  Useful linksInternational Library of African MusicRhodes UniversityThe Africa Guidelast_img read more

We’re all behind you, De Lille tells Bafana

first_img10 January 2014The Mayor of Cape Town, Patricia de Lille, visited Bafana Bafana at their training camp in the city on Thursday, ahead of Saturday’s kick off of the 2014 African Nations Championships (Chan) at Cape Town Stadium.The teams in the tournament are composed of players that ply their trade in their home countries. South Africa plays in the opening game against Mozambique, with kick off at 6pm, followed by fellow Group A contestants Mali and Nigeria doing battle at 9pm.De Lille personally met each and every player and member of the coaching staff before they began training. She also received a Bafana Bafana jersey from coach Gordon Igesund and captain Itumeleng Khune.‘They represent you and me’“It is always great and an honour to meet our sports stars because they represent you and me. It is even greater that, for the first time ever, we Cape Town are hosting Bafana Bafana for an international tournament,” she told the players.“I want to wish you the best of luck in the Chan competition. The whole nation is behind you, so go out there and do the nation proud.“I would also like to remind football fans around the country, in particular Capetonians, to go get their tickets and come support not just Bafana Bafana but the whole tournament,” she added.The history of ChanThe African Nations Championship has been played twice previously, with the Democratic Republic of Congo winning the first tournament, hosted by the Ivory Coast in 2009, by beating Ghana 2-0 in the final. Zambia finished third after a 2-1 defeat of Senegal.In 2011, in Sudan, Tunisia crushed Angola 3-0 in the final to capture the title. Sudan finished third after edging Algeria 1-0.Chan and Bafana BafanaSouth Africa failed to qualify for the first African Nations Championship finals after losing to Zimbabwe 3-0 on aggregate in the qualifiers.Bafana Bafana, however, made it to the finals in 2011 after seeing off both Botswana and Zambia on 2-1 aggregates in the qualifiers. They then finished top of Group B after wins of 2-1 over Ghana, 2-0 over Niger and 2-1 over Zimbabwe.South Africa’s tournament was ended by Algeria in the quarterfinals, with the North Africans scoring a 2-0 victory.SAinfo reporter and South African Football Associationlast_img read more

PVL: San Beda thwarts St. Benilde for second win

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next San Beda bounced back from its shutout loss to Arellano to tie the Lady Chiefs at second behind Adamson’s 2-0 mark.The Lady Blazers struck back from two sets down with a convincing win in third but lost steam after battling the Red Spikers in a fierce duel majority of the fourth. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThey slid to 0-2 and are in danger of missing the semifinals.St. Benilde came through with 15 blocks, including eight from Ranya Musa. Nieza Viray backed Racraquin with 12 points. LATEST STORIES Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo SBC’s top hitter Cesca Racraquin challenges St. Benildes’ Dianne Ventura as Marites Pablo tries to provide help during their PVL Collegiate Conference clash at the Filoil Flying V Center. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOSan Beda warded off St. Benilde’s late charge for a 25-21, 25-20, 17-25, 25-19 victory t in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference at Filoil Flying V Center Wednesday.Cesca Racraquin took charge with 15 points for the Red Spikers, who notched survived the Lady Blazers’ fightback to notch their second win.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ateneo Blue Babble protests CHR budget, EJKs at halftime performance Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

10 months agoBurnley goalkeeper Nick Pope: Great to be back

first_imgBurnley goalkeeper Nick Pope: Great to be backby Chris Beattie10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley goalkeeper Nick Pope is back in action after recovering from shoulder surgery.Pope played in his first match since dislocating his shoulder in July after turning out for the club’s under-23s on Monday.The 26-year-old played the full 90 minutes of an away clash against Sheffield United, which the Clarets won 3-1.Pope made his England debut in early June and was part of the Three Lions squad for the World Cup in Russia.He said: “It was great to be back, it’s been a long injury spell for myself but to get back and play a real game and 90 minutes was great.“I try to help out where I can, I remember playing those sorts of games when I was their age.“So, it was good to be one of the experienced ones there today, I think that’s part of the experience and part of my job to step down and help the younger lads out.” About the authorChris BeattieShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month ago​Newcastle boss Bruce: I understand Benitez tactics

first_img​Newcastle boss Bruce: I understand Benitez tacticsby Ansser Sadiqa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United boss Steve Bruce is beginning to understand why Rafa Benitez played a specific way at the club.Bruce took on a difficult job at Newcastle this summer, taking over from the very popular Benitez after the Spaniard could not agree a new contract.The Magpies drew 0-0 against Brighton, and were booed by their own fans at half time and full time in the clash.”Listen, whoever we are playing in the Premier League, we’ve got no divine right to beat Watford or Brighton so we all know they are going to be difficult games and that’s what the Premier League is but certainly if we are going to win games, we are going to have to play better and be better with the ball and without it,” Bruce told reporters after the game.”Today, in the first half in particular, we weren’t good enough either and left ourselves open and it’s pretty evident to me after being here eight weeks of why we can’t open up. “If we do that, we’re going to find it a struggle like we did in the first half. It wasn’t until we closed shop a little bit, even at home, that maybe got us a point.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Braxton Miller Hauls In A Football One-Handed While Holding 5 Other Footballs

first_imgBraxton Miller making an amazing one-handed catch.Braxton Miller One-HandedUpdate: Miller posted a video on his own account from a different angle. Earlier: Any concerns over Braxton Miller’s hands following his move to wide receiver could likely be alleviated by watching this video from the Ohio State football Instagram account. In the clip, Miller fields a ball launched from a JUGS machine while holding five other footballs. Ohio State deleted the post for some reason, but For The Win put it on YouTube. Yea, looks like he’s going to adjust just fine. [ For The Win ]last_img

Are The Warriors Ruining Basketball

FiveThirtyEight VIDEO: How the Cavs can push back in Game 3 Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (Jun. 6, 2017), we discuss the Nashville Predators’ win against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final. That series is now tied 2-2. Next, the Golden State Warriors are running roughshod over the Cleveland Cavaliers, which has some complaining that the NBA’s competitive balance is out of whack. We dig into league commissioner Adam Silver’s latest remarks on the matter and discuss whether the rise of the Warriors is a good thing or a bad thing for the NBA. Plus, a significant digit on an untethered ascent of El Capitan.Check out the following links to the topics we discussed.Pekka Rinne had a great Game 4 to help the Predators even things up.FiveThirtyEight’s NBA predictions say that the likelihood of the Warriors winning the series is 97 percent.In an interview with ESPN’s Mike and Mike, NBA commissioner Adam Silver fought back against claims that the Warriors have disrupted the league’s competitive balance.FiveThirtyEight’s Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner teamed up to break down Steph Curry’s return to form in this year’s NBA finals.Deadspin’s Albert Burneko writes that despite last year’s Cavaliers’ comeback, a Warriors victory feels inevitable this year.Is the superteam era ruining the NBA? Sports Illustrated’s Lee Jenkins investigates.Significant Digit: 3,300, the number of feet that Alex Honnold climbed on his route up El Capitan, the famous climbing wall inside Yosemite National Park. He did it all without a rope. Honnold has become the first free solo climber to scale the route. read more