ACC commissioner John Swofford to retire in June 2021

first_img Published on June 25, 2020 at 1:25 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford will retire following the 2020-21 athletic year, the conference announced Thursday morning. During his tenure, Swofford increased the number of ACC schools from nine to 15 through two expansions, including one that involved Syracuse seven years ago.Currently finishing his 23rd year in the role, Swofford is the fourth commissioner in ACC history. He took on the position after serving as North Carolina’s athletic director for 17 years. The ACC’s statement did not name Swofford’s successor.“It has been a privilege to be a part of the ACC for over five decades,” Swofford said in the conference’s press release. “There are immediate challenges that face not only college athletics, but our entire country, and I will continue to do my very best to help guide the conference in these unprecedented times through the remainder of my tenure.” As commissioner, Swofford was instrumental in the College Football Playoff expansion and the ACC/Big 10 Challenge for both men’s and women’s basketball, according to the release. He also helped establish the ACC Championship Game and Orange Bowl partnership for football. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse officially joined the ACC alongside Pittsburgh, Notre Dame and Louisville in 2013 as a second wave of additions. The first wave, which expanded the number of ACC schools from nine to 12 in 2004, included Boston College, Miami and Virginia Tech.The conference last August also launched ACC Network, a vision Swofford proposed in July 2016 that gave the league a revenue generator and an avenue to highlight non-revenue sports.The ACC’s Council of Presidents announced Monday that it will revise its constitution and bylaws to improve governance. Syracuse Chancellor Kent Syverud will serve as chair of the ACC’s Board of Directors, which the 15 league presidents and chancellors will fill. Swofford, serving as the conference’s chief executive officer, will be part of the new alignment for one year before retiring. “John Swofford, in his historic tenure, has come to embody the very best of the ACC,” Syverud said in the release.last_img read more

Freeman, Coleman provide 1-2 punch

first_imgHOUSTON (AP): Devonta Freeman and Tevin Coleman are so interchangeable in the Atlanta Falcons backfield, Matt Ryan gets a little mixed up at times. “He doesn’t even know who’s in the game,” Coleman said, breaking into a huge smile. Quite a 1-2 punch, these two are. It really doesn’t matter who you put at “1” and who goes at “2.” Sure, Freeman is the starter, but there’s no drop-off or any reason to change things up when Coleman comes into the game, a back-and-forth arrangement that keeps both backs fresh and gives fits to opposing defences. But their relationship runs beyond the field. Far beyond it. “That’s my brother,” Freeman said in the lead-up to tomorrow’s Super Bowl against the New England Patriots . “When you see someone, you see that they want to be a part of something special, they’re working hard, they’re working their butts off, you have no reason but to love that person and have the utmost respect for that person.” They’ll savour it while they can, because chances are this won’t be a long-term partnership. They’ll be friends for life, that’s for sure, but the realities of the NFL with its salary cap and other devices that make it difficult to keep a team together will likely lead to a breakup in the not-too-distant future. Freeman, a fourth-round pick out of Florida State in 2014, already created a bit of a stir early in Super Bowl week by bringing up his desire for a new contract. He rushed for more than 1,000 yards and has been selected for the Pro Bowl each of the past two seasons. Not surprisingly, he wants to be paid like one of the league’s top backs. Then there’s Coleman, a third-round pick out of Indiana in 2015. Despite missing three games with an injury this season, he rushed for 520 yards and eight touchdowns. At some point, he’s going to deserve more money and probably a larger role in someone’s offence. “We’ve thought about this a lot,” Coleman said. “But that’s going to be my brother always, wherever we’re at.” In addition to combining for just short of 1,600 yards on the ground, they are nearly as dangerous in the passing game. Freeman had 54 catches for 462 yards and a couple of scores, while Coleman hauled in 31 passes for 421 yards and three TDs.last_img read more

Ex-Arsenal star Adams named English rugby league president

first_imgThe 52-year-old will replace current Rugby Football League (RFL) president Andy Burnham, a politician for the centre-left Labour party and the mayor of Manchester, in the middle of next year.“Tony Adams is known and respected throughout sport and beyond, not only for his outstanding playing career with Arsenal, but more recently for his pioneering work with Sporting Chance,” RFL chairman Brian Barwick said.“The charity has helped more than 400 rugby league players since the RFL entered into an official partnership with Sporting Chance in 2011, and Tony himself delivered seminars at Wigan and Hull earlier this year.“The game has recognised the importance of mental health, for players and everyone else involved, and Tony’s election is another significant step in that regard.”Adams, who made more than 500 appearances for Arsenal and won 66 caps for England, founded the Sporting Chance clinic in 2000 following his own experiences with alcohol and drug addiction.Since the end of his playing career, Adams has had spells as manager of Wycombe, Portsmouth, Gabala and Granada.“It will be an honour to become the next president of the RFL,” said Adams, who won four English top-flight titles with Arsenal.“I’m passionate about working with everyone in the sport to raise the profile of mental health, wellness and resilience, for players and for everyone in Rugby League.“I’d like to play my part in championing this brilliant sport on the national stage.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Despite his roots in football, former Arsenal star Tony Adams (pictured December 2011) has close links with rugby league through his Sporting Chance charity © AFP/File / GLYN KIRKLONDON, United Kingdom, Dec 12 – Former Arsenal and England captain Tony Adams has been named the new president of English rugby league’s governing body, it announced on Wednesday.Despite his roots in football, Adams has close links with rugby league through his Sporting Chance charity.last_img read more