Court says journalist does not have to testify

first_imgNews Reporters without Borders welcomes the December 11 decision by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) not to force ex-Washington Post journalist Jonathan Randal to give evidence before it in a war crimes case. NetherlandsEurope – Central Asia Help by sharing this information RSF_en News RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive December 12, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Court says journalist does not have to testify Organisation Reporters without Borders welcomes the December 11 decision by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) not to force ex-Washington Post journalist Jonathan Randal to give evidence before it in a war crimes case.”This is a landmark,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard. “The decision is a legal precedent for the new International Criminal Court which will have to rule on such matters.””War reporters should have maximum protection while doing their dangerous job. Forcing them to give court evidence undermines their credibility and independence. We hope this decision will influence legislators in various countries, such as France, Portugal and Britain, where a journalist’s right not to reveal sources is poorly protected.”Randal was ordered to 7 June to give evidence to the Tribunal about an interview he had in 1993 with former Bosnian-Serb leader Radoslav Brdjanin, as part of the current genocide trial of Brdjanin and another Bosnian-Serb leader, Momir Talic. He refused and appealed against the decision.The ICTY judges ruled on the appeal that journalists working in war zones could not be forced to testify unless their “evidence had a direct and important value in determining a core issue in the case”. News to go further June 2, 2021 Find out more December 2, 2020 Find out more Ten RSF recommendations for the European Union NetherlandsEurope – Central Asia News Follow the news on Netherlands Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Receive email alerts November 23, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Peace treaty signing marked by renewed violence against journalists and media outlets

first_imgNews The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa News Reporters Without Borders welcomes the commitments made by participants at the Côte d’Ivoire peace talks with regards to media issues, but is quite concerned about the renewed violence against media and journalists in Côte d’Ivoire that has followed the signing of the treaty. Reporters Without Borders urges the authorities to respect their commitments and do everything possible to guarantee the safety of journalists working in the country. Côte d’IvoireAfrica Help by sharing this information to go further Reporters Without Borders welcomes the commitments made by participants at the Côte d’Ivoire peace talks with regards to media issues. The Linas-Marcoussistreaty, signed the night of 24 January 2003 and endorsed by the African heads of state who met in Paris two days later, enshrined Points V and VI on “Media” and “Human Rights”. “This treaty shows a real political will on the part of the Ivoirian leaders. But it is now the new government’s responsibility to respect and apply the commitments that were made,” stated Reporters Without Borders Secretary-General Robert Ménard. In fact, the organisation is quite concerned about the renewed violence against media and journalists in Côte d’Ivoire that has followed the signing of the treaty. Reporters Without Borders urges the authorities to respect their commitments and do everything possible to guarantee the safety of journalists working in the country.These measures must be respected and applied without delay. Violence andattacks against media outlets and journalists in the country have increased since the signing of the treaty, and the riots and demonstrations that followed the signing. On 26 January, the offices of the private station Radio Nostalgie, located in Abidjan’s Plateau neighbourhood, were ransacked by anti-French protesters. They smashed the station’s windows and destroyed office equipment. The station, whose director is Hamed Bakayoko, an official from Alassane Ouattara’s opposition Republican Rally (Rassemblement des Républicains) party, was previously attacked by armed men in October 2002. On the morning of 26 January,the offices of the independent newspaper Le Jour were also ransacked by youths opposed to the Marcoussis treaty. They destroyed or vandalised all of the paper’s equipment and poured gasoline throughout the offices, though they did not set the office on fire. Two of Le Jour’s contributors were assaulted by the mob while on their way to the paper’s offices. A short while before the attack, Le Jour had published two investigative reports on “death squads” in which they implicated the Ivoirian security forces.An Agence France-Presse journalist was also attacked in Cocody, a residential neighbourhood in Abidjan, and demonstrators threw stones at his vehicle. N’Guessan N’Guessan, a photographer from the newspaper Fraternité Matin, was also assaulted by youth protesters in Abidjan’s Plateau neighbourhood. The youths ran off with the flash from his camera. Several newspapers were unable to publish on 27 January because of these incidents, including Le Jour, Le Patriote and Le Réveil.Among the points in the treaty that deal with media, the new government of national reconciliation “condemns the incitement to hatred and xenophobia disseminated by certain media outlets”, and aims to give greater power over to the media regulation authorities, in order to assure that the professional code of ethics is respected. The new government also plans to “guarantee the neutrality and impartiality” of public media outlets and “favour media’s financial independence”. They have also pledged to reinstate broadcasts of international radio and television programmes.In addition, a national human rights commission will be created, in order to assure “the protection of rights and freedoms in Côte d’Ivoire”. The new government has committed itself to bringing the authors of major human rights violations before the International Criminal Court.On 16 January, Reporters Without Borders had called on political parties and rebel movements taking part in the Côte d’Ivoire peace talks to make a real commitmenttowards instituting a freer and more responsible press in the country. January 27, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Peace treaty signing marked by renewed violence against journalists and media outlets Follow the news on Côte d’Ivoire Receive email alerts Organisation October 16, 2020 Find out more RSF_en RSF’s recommendations for protecting press freedom during Côte d’Ivoire’s elections November 27, 2020 Find out more News Côte d’IvoireAfrica Reports October 29, 2020 Find out more Threats against journalists in run-up to Côte d’Ivoire’s presidential electionlast_img read more